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as far as I know, register (e.g., reg reg1) and register file (e.g., reg [3:0] reg2)

can be used in the always block whether it is a sequential (i.e., always @(posedge clk)) or combinational (i.e., always @*).

However, only when they are used in sequential always block, Flip-flops are inferred.

I think it's because register and register file in combinational always block are assigned continuously, so memory may not necessary.

However, I don't know why Verilog allows using register and register-files inside the always @* block which is a combinational circuit.

Is it because to enable RT level description such as if statement, case statement, etc in combinational logic?

The name 'reg' confuses me because its name implies the storage (FF), but it acts like a just wire inside the always @* block.

It seems that the 'reg' works as expected as a storage only inside the sequential always block.

Even though assign keyword allows a value to be assigned to a wire variable, is there any other reason that the Verilog allows register and register files to be used inside always @* block as a wire?

To me, a register and register file are just declared as a reg type in combinational always block to be used at LHS of assignment, but act as a wire type variable.

I appreciate any help.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Related SO Question. \$\endgroup\$ Dec 19, 2017 at 17:22
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    \$\begingroup\$ Ignore the Reg and Wire names. They're language constructs and are useless for predicting what Synthesis will do with your code. A Reg is called that because during simulation it acts as a variable between time steps, but in your actual circuit it can be combinational or a flip flop, as you've observed. \$\endgroup\$
    – jalalipop
    Dec 19, 2017 at 17:25
  • \$\begingroup\$ They are confusing. The reg and wire distinction where to ease the implementation of the simulator. Best is to start using System Verilog which does away with the concept and use the type 'logic' instead. But if I recall this question has been asked already several times. stackoverflow.com/questions/13282066/… \$\endgroup\$
    – Oldfart
    Dec 19, 2017 at 17:31
  • \$\begingroup\$ @user3535598 Hi, thanks for a comment. Out of curiosity, how the System Verilog is different from the Verilog? Is there any other motivation (including type) to develop System Verilog? \$\endgroup\$
    – ruach
    Dec 20, 2017 at 3:23
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    \$\begingroup\$ It's more complicated than that, unfortunately. In general it's a question of how you assign to it. If we ignore synthesis optimization that can make the final netlist looking nothing like your code (but functionally equivalent), @* will always guarantee a combinational circuit, and it will guarantee a non-latch so long as you assign to it in every conceivable case. @(posedge clk) can imply combinational or sequential. If you don't capture every case or have an assignment like "val <= val", it'll be a flipflop, otherwise combinational. All it guarantees is that you're synchronized to a clock. \$\endgroup\$
    – jalalipop
    Dec 20, 2017 at 12:59

2 Answers 2

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However, I don't know why Verilog allows using register and register-files inside the always @* block which is a combinational circuit.

Because designating a signal as reg or wire has nothing to do with whether it is implemented as the output of a register or a combinatorial circuit. It only relates to whether the signal can be assigned to by a procedural assignment (assignment in an initial or always block) or by a continuous assignment (assignment by an assign or instance output).

Reg signals can be assigned to in procedural blocks. Wire signals can be assigned by continuous assignment. That is absolutely all the different signal types mean, and this is simply something you have to get used to when working in Verilog.

The names seem to imply a different meaning because Verilog was originally intended to be a tool for modeling hardware that was designed by other tools rather than a tool to synthesize new designs, and so using it for synthesis has a few warts that reflect the inherent kluginess of doing that.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ "initial or always block or by an assign" - a.k.a. Procedural assignment (for reg) vs. Continuous assignment (for wire). \$\endgroup\$ Dec 19, 2017 at 17:36
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    \$\begingroup\$ @TomCarpenter, thanks, I knew there were names for those things, just didn't remember them off the top of my head or find them with some quick searching. Edited now. \$\endgroup\$
    – The Photon
    Dec 19, 2017 at 17:41
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The Verilog 1364-2001 LRM changed the terminology so that reg is actually a data type of a variable. Wires represent a sustained signal that is driven by a continuous assignment. A synthesis tool recognizes the pattern of how you use a variable, and determines whether the variable becomes combinational logic, a latch, or a FF.

SystemVerilog replaces the keyword reg with logic to avoid this confusion. It also adds constructs like always_ff so you can indicate the intent of your always block. See http://go.mentor.com/wire-vs-reg

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks for a nice blog post. It was really helpful to understand this issue. However, could you let me know what motivates a development of the system-verilog? I would like to know which problems or issues are dealt with in the system-verilog, which may not be solvable in the Verilog. \$\endgroup\$
    – ruach
    Dec 20, 2017 at 3:38
  • \$\begingroup\$ See quora.com/… \$\endgroup\$
    – dave_59
    Dec 20, 2017 at 6:25
  • \$\begingroup\$ I appreciate it. It helps me a lot :D. \$\endgroup\$
    – ruach
    Dec 20, 2017 at 8:09

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