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I travel a fair bit for work and after a fair bit of searching I can't seem to find any decisive answers on a power issue I often run into.

With most computer parts taking the IEC C13 cable(kettle lead) attached to their local plug variant I am curious if a part actually even requires a step up/down converter if the power source in the country is within the tolerances for that particular device. I deal with a fair bit of high end electronics but often have to rely on these, often unreliable, converters for our displays.

An example would be a monitor we use for one of our displays which has the following power ratings on the label.

Power Rating

Just for reference I think this was purchased in the UK and for power source there is no external power brick, I would hazard a guess and say it has to be an internal converter due to the range on the power rating. The device is just a type G (3-pin plug) as is common for the UK to a IEC C13 (Kettle lead) end.

The question boils down to if in another Country would I be able to use the local kettle lead variant with their plug or is a convertor needed EG the US 3/2 pin or the the AUS 3/2 pin. Also if so would there any considerations that need to be made.

I have spoken with suppliers but they aren't willing to discuss to the topic to any major degree as I would likely be re-buying parts after a converter failure and plugging one in the find is possibly a very expensive way.

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If you are dealing with an unmodified piece of commercially sold equipment you should be fine to trust the information on the rating label. That is the whole point of printing that information on the device in the first place.

Older devices often had voltage selection mechanisms and if present you need to take care to ensure that these are set correctly for the mains supply the device will be connected to. Setting a voltage selector to 120V and plugging the device into a 240V supply is likely to cause fireworks. This has fallen out of favour in recent times, nowadays they normally just build power supplies with a wide input range.

It doesn't make any difference from the device's point of view whether you use a plug adapter or swap out the power cord.

If you are dealing with custom built/modified gear it may be wise to talk to those who built/modified it to check that the rating label matches reality.

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    \$\begingroup\$ a device with a voltage selector switch will have a / in the rating label ("110-120/220-240V") \$\endgroup\$ – ThreePhaseEel Dec 24 '17 at 5:08
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100-240V means "universal"

What you're looking at here is what's called a universal input -- it can accept 100V at either 50 or 60Hz (Japanese power), 120V at 60Hz (US single phase power), 240V at 60Hz (US NEMA 6, Philippines, ...), 240V at 50 Hz (European/IEC), or even 208V at 60Hz (US "wild leg" or sometimes phase-to-phase as well).

So, just get the appropriate kettle lead for the country in question and plug 'er in, no converter needed!

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