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This has driven me mad, I've searched for this on google and am now going to the world to find out what the part is called. I've tried things like "Gang bar", "shared cover", did a google image search of the two images I have, and anything else I could think of, but without knowing what it is I cannot accurately search for it. It's a part that can connect multiple toggles together for an action, usually to "off", sometimes allowing for individual "on" activation. Attached are two pictures to assist. It's the Black bar on the brass switches image and the two Chrome bars on the other image. Any help is appreciated.

Picture from Wiki Picture from Aircraft Spruce

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    \$\begingroup\$ In general, "switch ganging mechanisms" covers it. It is what you will see in patents. \$\endgroup\$ – jonk Dec 24 '17 at 18:34
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    \$\begingroup\$ When applied to circuit breakers it's called a 'handle tie'. \$\endgroup\$ – brhans Dec 24 '17 at 19:33
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    \$\begingroup\$ switch tie bar or handle tie bar \$\endgroup\$ – jsotola Dec 25 '17 at 20:26
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    \$\begingroup\$ Many of these types of interlocks/ganging mechanisms are custom made to the application. I would be surprised if you found one that was off-the-shelf. \$\endgroup\$ – Ron Beyer Dec 27 '17 at 16:47
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    \$\begingroup\$ @RonBeyer: I agree with you. Those "interlocking bars" are custom made, so it is very unlikely that there would be a "common" part name/number that the general public could use to order the part. Daryl, if you don't need too many, you could use a "mold" and make your own plastic bars, or find a manufacturer to make them for you. \$\endgroup\$ – Guill Dec 28 '17 at 19:02
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Multiple switches that are physically ganged together could be represented with a dashed line between the individual throws, like this:

schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

Other physical connections between switches, like the ones in your pictures, are more of a mechanical component than an electrical one, and would typically be omitted from a schematic. There is no standard symbology I'm aware of for such a thing.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Yeah, if it's relevant to point out the use handle ties a symbol like this one and/or a note in the schematic seems appropriate. \$\endgroup\$ – user162889 Feb 12 '18 at 23:14
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This is related to many older schematic symbols like multi section switches and ganged variable capacitors/potentiometers. Just join the arrow or dot ends of the switch toggles, if the switches use these, or the bars of the switches with dashed lines. In either Eagle, Altium or PADS, place a "part" consisting of a polygon on the dashed line and give that a part number including a description. This is a mechanical part just like a screw or standoff that would go into a standard Bill Of Materials. What we do when we need these sorts of things is to link that part number to a mechanical CAD drawing of the linkage device. Ages ago, for a gangable potentiometer used a lot in vacuum tube designs there was a separate rod with detents and we had to assemble the 3, 4 or 5 gang pots and insert the rods by hand. It was just called a Multipot Linkage.

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