1
\$\begingroup\$

First, I'm am new to using transistors and MOSFETs in electronics circuits.

I have extremely basic notions of electronics, and am able to setup and use "of the shelf" boards and Arduino modules, and I do know how basic electronic components work.

Now I'm trying to do the jump to start creating a bit more advanced projects, and I'm struggling to do a simple project with recycled components from some PCBs that I recycled with the help of a heat gun.

I have some PWM fans that I can control using the Arduino, but I would like to shut them down completely, which does not happen without a "switch".

Since I don't have a relay at hand, but I have some NPN and PNP transistors, photocouplers and MOSFETs, I wanted to try to do something with them.

I have this compact MIP2M4 MOSFET that supports the load that I'm going to use of 1A, since it's two 12v 0.5A fans.

I don't want the MOSFET to control the speed of the fans, I just want it to power them off when I send a "0" value PWM signal from the Arduino to the fans, and to turn them on when I send a higher PWM value to the fans.

Can someone help me understand how can I wire the MIP2M4 with the Arduino and the fans to achieve this? I tried it with a NPN C2655, but since it got only a 5v signal on the base, it only outputs 4.83v and the fan runs really slow...

MIP2M4 DS https://industrial.panasonic.com/content/data/SC/ds/ds4/MIP2M40MT_E.pdf

Thank you in advance!

AC

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Update: Got this to work with a K3878, but I can't figure out on the MIP which pin works as gate. Can someone please help me identify which pin is used as gate on the MIP? \$\endgroup\$ – avc Dec 30 '17 at 16:57
  • \$\begingroup\$ The MIP2M4 is not a MOSFET - it is a fairly complicated specialized IC - see page 9 of the datasheet for the internal block diagram of the device. \$\endgroup\$ – Peter Bennett Jan 4 '18 at 0:07
  • \$\begingroup\$ Show a diagram of your present PWM control circuit. There is a schematic editor available while editing your message - type "Control-M" or the button to start it. \$\endgroup\$ – Peter Bennett Jan 4 '18 at 0:12
1
\$\begingroup\$

After digging some more, it seems that this MOSFET is designed to be used with AC current, so I'll just do this with some IRL540's or similar.

| improve this answer | |
\$\endgroup\$
1
\$\begingroup\$

Most computer fans arnt more than 0.250 mA so a Mosfet like the cheap and common BS108 (N-Channel, Logic Level too)

Can also be connected to an Arduino PWM Pin (Arduino with Atmega328 IC has upto 6 PWM Pins!)

im currently making a PWM Fan controller too, plus trying to see if i can get the arduino to read the 2-pulses per rotation for the calculation of fan's RPM

50 TO-92 package mosFET's here :)

:)

| improve this answer | |
\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ If English is not your first language you could add this to your user profile. Someone will help fix up your post. Welcome to EE.SE. \$\endgroup\$ – Transistor Jan 24 '18 at 21:29
0
\$\begingroup\$

Whatever you are using to control the fan via PWM should (must!) be able to turn the fan off when you set the PWM pulse width to zero. You shouldn't need any additional switching device.

| improve this answer | |
\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Hi Peter. I'm going to use simple MOSFETs to do this. My motherboard keeps the fans on at minimum RPM with the PWM signal at 0, so I'll just build my own controller, that will work between the fans and the motherboard headers. Thank you. \$\endgroup\$ – avc Jan 5 '18 at 16:52

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.