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so ive got quite a bit of questions about these DC - AC converters, so ive got an inverter wich converts 9V DC alcaline battery to around 240V AC output, my questions are, is this circuit realy useable, because i see videos on youtube a 9v battery can power 120v or 240v light boulbs, so im wondering would this be a heavy load on the 9v battery, is this realy useable, can it realy power devices like a computer monitor or such, ik it sounds crazy, so please explaine to me why this type of circuit is bad and whats wrong with it, my worry is that its to of a heavy load for the battery and the battery would expload! here's the datasheet of the inverter component https://www.electronicsdatasheets.com/manufacturers/endicott-research-group--erg/parts/lps0935

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closed as unclear what you're asking by winny, Voltage Spike, Sparky256, Lior Bilia, Andy aka Jan 12 '18 at 15:38

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    \$\begingroup\$ it is unclear what you are asking ... usually people ask before they buy something, not after. \$\endgroup\$ – jsotola Jan 4 '18 at 8:11
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    \$\begingroup\$ DC-AC inverters are more commonly used with large 12V deep-cycle battery banks, not 9V batteries. To drive a 60 watt load at 120VAC, the 9V battery source would need to provide at least 60W / 9V = 6000mA of current, far too much for a consumer 9V battery. See datasheet for Energizer522 9V Alkaline Battery. The battery can provide 10mA of current for about 60-70 hours, or 100mA of current for about 3 hours. At 300mA it will be dead within an hour. The graph doesn't show how long the battery can last at 6000mA, but I'm guessing much less than an hour. \$\endgroup\$ – MarkU Jan 4 '18 at 8:16
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    \$\begingroup\$ Having looked at the datasheet, this inverter is supposed to be used to power backlight lamps, not regular bulbs. It outputs 120V at 400Hz, and can provide only a few watts. You aren't going to do much with that. \$\endgroup\$ – dim Jan 4 '18 at 9:23
  • \$\begingroup\$ @MarkU probably even at 1A you will get a 0s time, since the internal resistance will let the battery output a very low voltage and so you get no usable energy \$\endgroup\$ – frarugi87 Jan 4 '18 at 16:17
  • \$\begingroup\$ because i see videos on youtube a 9v battery can power 120v or 240v light boulbs, I can make a youtube video where I power my car using a 9V battery, would you believe that as well? \$\endgroup\$ – Bimpelrekkie Jan 12 '18 at 15:04
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The power supplied by a DC->AC converter to its load comes from the DC input.

The part you've chosen, an LPS09-3-5, is designed for driving an EL panel, rated at 5 unit loads. In this case, a unit load is defined as 20nF//100kohm, taking 6.1mA at 120v rms at 400Hz. The specification goes on to say that each unit load requires 500mW of input power from the battery. I notice the VA of a unit load is 730mW, which confirms the low power factor of the load.

Will the output of 120v 30mA 400Hz (into a 100nF//20kohm load) do what you want it to?

How long will your 9v battery last delivering 2.5 watts?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ @dim Sigh! RTFM. Edit answer. Happy? \$\endgroup\$ – Neil_UK Jan 4 '18 at 9:44

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