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So my local dollar store doesn't sell rubbing alcohol, but does sell acetone.

Can I use acetone instead of rubbing alcohol on electronics?

I know acetone does attack some plastics but rubbing alcohol doesn't.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Check a pharmacy for rubbing alcohol, I would not use acetone. \$\endgroup\$ – Ron Beyer Jan 19 '18 at 18:01
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    \$\begingroup\$ Acetone is a great way to remove all of the coatings from your PCBs...And get some skin injures too if no precautions are taken. \$\endgroup\$ – Eugene Sh. Jan 19 '18 at 18:04
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    \$\begingroup\$ use isopropyl alcohol. \$\endgroup\$ – Marko Buršič Jan 19 '18 at 18:13
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    \$\begingroup\$ Be careful using consumer chemicals. Their purity is poor and often have added chemicals to make them an attractive color or smell that leaves a residue. \$\endgroup\$ – Trevor_G Jan 19 '18 at 18:40
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    \$\begingroup\$ it's good for cleaning edge connectors and removing yellow on some plastics. \$\endgroup\$ – dandavis Jan 19 '18 at 19:39
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you never use acetone on a pc board unless you are stripping the top coatings off (copper lacquer (usually green) and component screen print). You can always use a pencil erasure on touchups. If you don't have any no wash items installed (pc mount speakers, non hermetically sealed contact relays, etc) you could just throw the board in the top rack of a dishwasher to clean it. Back when I worked at SCI we stuffed boards surface mount and wash pin and hole items (connectors) flow solder them, then washed them (on a glorified dishwasher on a conveyor belt) then stuffed the no wash items in then spot clean with a alcohol pad (maybe, depend on who and what we were building).

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