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  1. I need to make a circuit which gives me ac voltage in the range of 5-20 kV and frequency above 1 khz. The ac voltage which my lab gets is 50 hz 240 v. I need to somehow step up the voltage and frequency for my project.

  2. Is their any lab equipment that can be used to do this?

  3. One more thing, I know how to make a voltage multiplier using a battery but I dont know wether it increases the frequency as well.

Thank you for your help.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by DoxyLover, Harry Svensson, Sparky256, laptop2d, Charles Cowie Jan 22 '18 at 19:48

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    \$\begingroup\$ "I need to make a circuit", cool. Good for you. \$\endgroup\$ – Harry Svensson Jan 21 '18 at 6:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ This sounds like a « Jacob’s ladder « type thing - lots about on the net - good luck. \$\endgroup\$ – Solar Mike Jan 21 '18 at 6:53
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    \$\begingroup\$ Welcome to the site. Please realise that this is not a free design house or an on-line technical encyclopedia, copied out to you on demand. Also purchase recommendations are off topic and we do not push product manufacturers. People will help you take the next step if your question shows that you've done as much as you possibly could on your own - which your post doesn't, I'm afraid. Please revise your question showing your work and result so far, in considerable detail. Again, a warm welcome to the site. \$\endgroup\$ – Oldfart Jan 21 '18 at 9:49
  • \$\begingroup\$ most people here will want to design such a device for you, if you want to purchase lab equipment this is probably the wrong community, "physics" might be able to help. \$\endgroup\$ – Jasen Jan 21 '18 at 11:27
  • \$\begingroup\$ I dont want to purchase. I am a mechanical engineering student of 3rd year working on a research project. For that I need an the electrical source. But I have limited knowledge of electronics. \$\endgroup\$ – Rohan Jan 22 '18 at 4:16
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An old automotive ignition coil had a gain of 1k Just drive with a sig gen or 555 or whatever.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ This is a pretty good idea. However an ignition coil it is not a particularly good transformer as it is intended to store energy in the magnetic field and has a lot of flux leakage. It will need good drive to give you 20kV. I think a old colour TV fly-back transformer might be a better starting point though the generic circuits are often rather fussy about the frequency of operation. When the resonant energy recovery circuits failed they would usually toast the drive transistor or transformer. They were designed around the 15kHz range and this may be higher than OP can tolerate. \$\endgroup\$ – KalleMP Jan 22 '18 at 15:54
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I would look to surplus (old analogue) photocopier bias and discharge AC high voltage generator modules. You may be able to locate one that has an acceptable frequency of operation (though they may not be specified or static) and be able to adjust the voltage (usually only safe or practical to adjust it downwards) to suit your application.

These units are not intended or able to provide much current but perhaps your application will still be served.

The thing you may be looking for would look like one of the illustrated boards.

To design one from scratch is not a simple task and would require a lot of research. I saw some pictures of kits and perhaps this would be a middle ground for you as they may be more flexible in specifications.

EDIT:

There are various bits of consumer gear that seem to make use of similar power supplies. One is an ioniser another would be a Neon discharge tube supply. Images Scientific Instruments may have a possible product and they appear to be adjustable, there are sure to be others.

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