3
\$\begingroup\$

I want to drive an LCD that needs 6V from a RaspberryPi. The Pi has a 3.3V logic power-pin, and a 5V power-pin that's directly connected to the MicroUSB-PowerSupply.

  • Am i right in the assumption that all MicroUSB-Supplies are regulated, so the PI expects / delivers regulated 5V-voltage on this pin?

  • What happens i connect a voltage-converter (Step-Up?) to this 5V line and connect this circuit to the GPIO-InputPins? Is that even possible? Does the circuit then have 5V or the voltage that the converters delivers?

\$\endgroup\$
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Connecting 6V to the GPIO is likely to overheat and damage your device. You need a "level shifter", which depending on frequency could be as simple as one transistor per line in "open collector" configuration. \$\endgroup\$ – pjc50 Jul 9 '12 at 9:12
  • \$\begingroup\$ 6 V for power, I assume? Not for I/O, right? \$\endgroup\$ – Brian Carlton Jul 30 '12 at 23:08
  • \$\begingroup\$ Correct. 6V for Power. \$\endgroup\$ – Fabian Zeindl Jul 31 '12 at 7:09
  • \$\begingroup\$ Why is 'Arduino' in the title for this question? \$\endgroup\$ – ThomasW Mar 27 '13 at 0:50
3
\$\begingroup\$

As pointed out before, build a 6V power supply and connect transistors (possible FETs) to the GPIO pins to drive the display. If you have trouble, check:

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.