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Would a Fluke 87V meter be able to run on a 9V Li-ion rechargeable battery capable of 550mAh?

In general (for any device), what information (device specifications) would I need in the future in order to be able to answer this sort of question? Current? Power consumption (how long a battery lasts in the device)?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I have used the Fluke 87 III series a lot. \$\endgroup\$
    – user105652
    Jan 31 '18 at 23:32
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Sparky256 Did you use a rechargeable battery with it? \$\endgroup\$
    – Snoop
    Jan 31 '18 at 23:32
  • \$\begingroup\$ Only for 6 months. It was attributed to just 1 cell in 3 going bad, making the entire battery useless. They have to compromise because no 3 Li-Ion battery in series puts out exactly 9 volts. It is more like 10 volts. Does not hurt the DVM though. \$\endgroup\$
    – user105652
    Jan 31 '18 at 23:41
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Yes, but the lifetime between charges may be quicker than you think. Normally a 9 volt battery has 6 each 1.5 volt batteries in series. But Li-Ion batteries put out 3.3 volts or so. A 9 volt lithium battery may actually put out 10 volts on a full charge, but the 3 tiny cells in series are no better than a good alkaline battery.

The Fluke 87 III is miserly with its power consumption and has a sleep mode for the display if you have it in record mode.

Initially the rechargeable lithium batteries may seem like a good buy, but remember that if one cell goes bad from overcharging or from letting them go dead, it will block any current from the good cells, so it may seem that in the long run you have to replace them more often than you thought.

I have used 9 volt lithium batteries before and was disappointed at their maximum life-span, so we went back to using good alkaline batteries, which last a full year but are replaced every year by UL testing standards.

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The Fluke 87 User Manual specifies the compatible batteries as NEDA 1604, 6F22, or 006P. A cursory search turns up Lithium-Ion batteries in the 6F22 format. So, yeah, those type should work.

Many primary batteries have a rechargeable equivalent. Either through stacking cells or internal voltage regulators. The main thing to avoid is placing primary (non-rechargeable) batteries into devices that expect rechargeable batteries. The other-way-around is usually more forgiving.

In general you need to meet the voltage, meet or exceed the current rating, and ideally exceed the capacity.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks for you understanding, and answering this question in detail. One of those situations, where... I know what I want to ask... but not sure what terms to use. In particular, what electrical characteristics would answer the question of what batteries might be okay. \$\endgroup\$
    – Snoop
    Jan 31 '18 at 23:38
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Snoopy No problem. Your question was perfectly clear. \$\endgroup\$
    – Samuel
    Jan 31 '18 at 23:39

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