0
\$\begingroup\$

(sorry for the n00b/cringey question!) I've order an ADC chip and I realized upon receiving it that standard Dupont style jumper wires don't fit on standard integrated chips pins. I was wondering if an IC to jumper wire connector/socket even exists and if so, then what it's called.

Basically, what I'm aiming for is a single component that combines a DIP socket (at least 2x8 pins) and Dupont style jump wire header pins so that I can push my IC in that socket and connect jumper wires without any soldering.

The closest I could find is this guy who made himself a couple ones with breadboard, but does that exist as a single standard component?

Thx

enter image description here

\$\endgroup\$

closed as off-topic by Trevor_G, Voltage Spike, Sparky256, Bimpelrekkie, Dmitry Grigoryev Feb 13 '18 at 12:33

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ Wouldn't that be a breadboard? \$\endgroup\$ – SolveEtCoagula07 Feb 8 '18 at 16:52
  • \$\begingroup\$ As I wrote in the last sentence: Does that exist as a single component? \$\endgroup\$ – that-ben Feb 8 '18 at 17:15
  • \$\begingroup\$ Can you still get wirewrap sockets? \$\endgroup\$ – RoyC Feb 9 '18 at 9:45
  • \$\begingroup\$ On chinese market, they seem non existent whatsoever. Looks like a thing of the past indeed! It's sad, because I see fit in many hobby projects. At least, I find a DIP socket to be much quicker/better than fiddling with a big piece of breadboard. \$\endgroup\$ – that-ben Feb 9 '18 at 23:22
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ While solutions exist, connecting an IC on the end of jumper wires is generally a bad idea; when that chip is an ADC, it is an extremely bad idea. You really need a circuit board with good grounding, supply bypassing, decoupling of analog supplies and reference from digital noise sources, etc. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Feb 11 '18 at 23:24
2
\$\begingroup\$

You might look into wire wrap sockets which look like thisenter image description here

Or you could use a breadboard: enter image description here If you are ok with using jumper cables with one end having a male pin, you can push your IC into the breadboard and use your jumpers to connect to it. Breadboards are pretty standard for electronics prototyping, and typically people plug their components into them and use short jumpers to make connections where required.

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ I do not want to use a breadboard for this. I'm looking for a single component that allows me to use DIP with female Dupont jumper wires and it seems your first sentence is what I need, but are you sure the spacing is standard for jumper wires and DIP's? Also, is there a name or is it just called "wire wrap sockets"? Thx! \$\endgroup\$ – that-ben Feb 8 '18 at 17:13
  • \$\begingroup\$ The spacing is 2.54mm or 0.1in, same as standard male headers. Yes, they're just called wire wrap sockets \$\endgroup\$ – C_Elegans Feb 8 '18 at 17:22
  • \$\begingroup\$ Why are wire wrap sockets holes round? Will the DIP chip snugly fit in there as opposed to DIP sockets which have plier style holes? e.g.: dojft4652t1in.cloudfront.net/wp-content/uploads/CN-IC-1403.jpg \$\endgroup\$ – that-ben Feb 8 '18 at 17:23
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes, the round holes will work. The sockets are designed to accept standard DIP ICs \$\endgroup\$ – C_Elegans Feb 8 '18 at 17:25
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @that-ben wire wrap isn't really an actively used technology anymore, so mainline vendors are likely going to charge a lot to stock rarely needed components - the only place you are likely to get a good deal is a surplus vendor, hamfest, etc. Female headers probably won't do a good job of holding DIP IC leads. None of these solutions are sensible for an ADC anyway; you really need the supporting circuitry to be right at the IC, not remoted on wires. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Feb 11 '18 at 23:28

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.