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schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

I am using a L293D to light up LED's. I provide a 24 volt To light up my LED's. Courant comsuption of each LED is 30 mA. The maximum number of LED's I turn on is 10 (current of 300 mA). Minimum LED's I trun on is 2 (current of 60 mA ). Is the L293D appropriate for my application ? Am I in the recommended operation range of the L293D ?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by TonyM, Trevor_G, Finbarr, Dave Tweed Feb 25 '18 at 12:27

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • \$\begingroup\$ seems like overkill to me..and why drive them in parallel? \$\endgroup\$ – Trevor_G Feb 9 '18 at 18:52
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Seems like you're making things overly complicated to me.

1) Why are you running the LEDs at 24V? You could just run them at 5V and waste less power. You need roughly a 110 ohm resistor (assuming a ~1.7V LED drop) to get 30mA.

2) Since you have between 2 and 10 LEDs, you need 10 independent drive circuits.

3) This can be accomplished with a simple single MOSFET per LED. See circuit below. You would use a copy of this circuit for each LED. (NOTE: The MOSFET and LED part numbers shown are just the default - make sure you use a logic-level drive MOSFET).

4) Depending on how bright you need the LEDs to be, you can probably just run them directly from the arduino IO pins. Many little indicator LEDs will be easily visible at 1-2mA.

schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

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