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Suppose, I have 40A ESC and Brushless Motor with max current capacity of 30A. I am using Receiver for controlling Motor speed and Arduino as controller. Receiver sends 1ms to 2ms pulse every 20ms. Same way Arduino sends 1ms to 2ms pulse every 20ms where at 1ms pulse ESC will not spin motor(Stops) and at 2ms pulse ESC will spin motor at top speed.

But as mentioned ESC is of 40A and motor is of 30A then at 2ms pulse ESC might sending pulse to Motor of the range of 40A (I doubt) then it should damage motor? Or, is ESC smart enough to figure out max current capacity of Motor(30A and calibrate itself accordingly and sends pulse signal of 30A capacity at 2ms pulse)?

If not then how to decide the width of pulse sent from Arduino to ESC for max current capacity of Motor?

Thanks in Advance.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ The pulse doesn't determine the current sent to the motor. It (loosely) determines the voltage sent to the motor. The torque load on the motor determines the current. So, control that. Or measure the current, and reduce the voltage if it exceeds 30A for any length of time (moderate short overloads shouldn't cause damage). \$\endgroup\$ – Brian Drummond Feb 15 '18 at 13:28
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But as mentioned ESC is of 40A and motor is of 30A then at 2ms pulse ESC might sending pulse to Motor of the range of 40A (I doubt) then it should damage motor?

The "40A" figure is the peak current that the ESC can provide should the connected load (the motor) demand that current. If the output voltage of the ESC and the motor are compatible then a 30 amp motor will only take 30 amps under full-load conditions.

It may take more than 30 amps under stall conditions but that is a different situation outside the scope of this question.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks for the answer. So if I send 2ms pulse from Arduino to the ESC then ESC will send only 30A capacity of signal to Motor, right? \$\endgroup\$ – vivek patel Feb 15 '18 at 13:39
  • \$\begingroup\$ No, the ESC will send a voltage to the motor and if that motor is at full load (full mechanical power out) it will take 30 amps of current - if the motor was only lightly loaded it might only take 1 amp of current but the same voltage will still be supplied by the ESC. \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka Feb 15 '18 at 13:51

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