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I once have a tablet (Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 GT-P5210) that has an IR blaster built to it.

I sometimes use it to control the TV on our house if the remote is lost.

Now, I don't understand that if I use it to control the TV, they are saying that the TV will be damaged.

Is this true, or is this some kind of a myth, so that only the "traditional and usual" way of controlling appliances (which is the remote) will only be followed?
Like, the technology is improving, and we now have an IR remote built on our phones and tablets, but we should still use the remote built for that appliance?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Who are they? I find it highly unlikely. \$\endgroup\$ – winny Feb 18 '18 at 9:47
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    \$\begingroup\$ Does she have a degree in EE? \$\endgroup\$ – winny Feb 18 '18 at 10:02
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    \$\begingroup\$ @winny Probably no. I think, she is saying that because she don't want me to use the tablet for controlling the TV. She only want us to use the remote. \$\endgroup\$ – Lloyd Dominic Feb 18 '18 at 10:08
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    \$\begingroup\$ Maybe Samsung shouldn't had advertized it as a blaster. \$\endgroup\$ – Janka Feb 18 '18 at 10:24
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    \$\begingroup\$ All of this over semantics..yeesh! VTC. \$\endgroup\$ – Sparky256 Feb 19 '18 at 3:21
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Since IR is just light that is invisible to the human eye, it can't really damage the TV. They switch the IR LED in the remote on and off at a given frequency to represent a set digital value, that the TV then decodes.

Blocking other IR signals is a different topic, but it's highly unlikely. Btw, you can see IR through older cameras that don't have IR filtering.

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    \$\begingroup\$ as @Janka pointed out, some service-only remote codes can change settings in your TV, but it's highly unlikely that a tablet randomly has those programmed \$\endgroup\$ – DaniFoldi Feb 18 '18 at 10:32
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The Samsung tool could accidentally issue RC codes meant for service technicians only. The last CRT I had died slowly, and the technician came and took out his service remote and could adjust the TV through it. It was even possible to select the high voltage level - that was meant to have the same electronics for different sized tubes. It stored the changed parameters into the TVs EEPROM.

So yes, using random remote codes can damage your TV.

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