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This question is an exact duplicate of:

this is my first electronics project that i am doing so my understanding is pretty basic. I am using an ESP8266 connected to a L293D motor driver to power a bipolar stepper motor. The issue I am having is the pin connections.

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This is the microcontroller that i am using. It has 9 GPIO pins at 3.3V.

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This is the driver I am using.

My first question is whether I can use the 3V out of the micro controller to power the EN pins? On the data sheet, on Recommended Operating Conditions, the High-level input voltage is a minimum of 2.3V so I guess this would be ok?

Secondly, I am trying to drive a 12V bipolar stepper motor so I am unsure whether I would need to use a second motor driver due to the lack of available pins on the driver.

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marked as duplicate by Andy aka, Voltage Spike, RoyC, Finbarr, Dave Tweed Feb 24 '18 at 20:06

This question was marked as an exact duplicate of an existing question.

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L293D has two channels and it can control two motors. One in each channel. The maximum current which can be drawn from a channel = 600 mA with peak output of 1.2 A. The current rating of the motor supply should be enough to drive both motors. The Vcc has to be at least 4.5 V says L293D data sheet. So powering it by 3.3 V would be a gamble as noise margins would be small. If you power it by at least 4.5 V, then you can make sure that anything over 2.5 V is enough to drive a logic high to enable pins.

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This IC is for one stepper motor, so yes, you will need a second IC for a second motor. You can reuse some pins from this one's control system, just need dedicated EN pins. Don't forget the heatsink and the additional 5V supply for the chip.

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