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I'm thinking about making a DIY project (this one).

I'm a complete n00b, I just have some theoretical knowledge about electronics from some university courses, and I'd like to learn some more. I was thinking about avoiding to buy the kit PCB (which is double sided) and, since I have the schematics, trying to replicate it on a stripboard. Is this reasonable, and which workflow should I follow? Make a solderless breadboard prototype based on the PCB design and then a final model on the stripboard or redesigning the layout on a CAD software? I don't know if there is a best practice about this or if it's even possible.

Thank you.

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    \$\begingroup\$ I would buy the PCB if it's your very first project, get used to soldering and troubleshooting etc. It's pretty complicated, laying this out on stripboard would be testing... :) \$\endgroup\$
    – awjlogan
    Commented Feb 26, 2018 at 14:47
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    \$\begingroup\$ To get an idea of the complexity of the board, it might be a good idea to try and breadboard one of the components, for example the white noise generator which can be tested in isolation. \$\endgroup\$
    – Makoto
    Commented Feb 26, 2018 at 15:00
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    \$\begingroup\$ but wow, for a first DIY project, you've set the bar quite high for yourself \$\endgroup\$
    – Makoto
    Commented Feb 26, 2018 at 15:00
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    \$\begingroup\$ @awjlogan Just ranting over how the scematics draw the NPN upside down as well as mirrored 180 degrees. This is hard to follow and therefore not an ideal schematic for beginners to study. "I have seen worse" is no excuse. \$\endgroup\$
    – Lundin
    Commented Feb 26, 2018 at 15:24
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    \$\begingroup\$ @InfiniteSnow Well, in that case, it might be better to actually design your own PCB using Eagle, KiCad (etc etc). Personally, projects that size on perf have never been fun, more frustrating, whereas designing a proper PCB can teach you lots. \$\endgroup\$
    – awjlogan
    Commented Feb 26, 2018 at 15:29

2 Answers 2

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If you want to use stripboard, there are CAD stripboard layout editors (e.g. VeeCAD - see Stripboard/veroboard/matrix board design software).

These editors allow you to arrange the circuit and plan links/breaks, then you print it on paper, stick the paper on the stripboard, do the soldering.

This is better than trying to optimize the layout by breadboarding since repeatedly moving components around will probably cause them damage (and is slower to do).

As an aside, if you would "like to learn some more" (electronics design), is doing a load of soldering really going to help?

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Every component has its own voltage level and as I see the circuit diagram has lot of components like op-amps, FETs etc. I would suggest doing it in software before going to breadboard as many components may burn out. MATLAB is a perfet software for checking out the graphs and u can also program it in Multisim where there are real time components with ic nos that will help you in making this kit a lot faster.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Welcome to EE.SE Ankit. Unfortunately this isn't really an answer to the question: the circuit has been designed already, and the poster wants to know about the layout. \$\endgroup\$
    – awjlogan
    Commented Feb 26, 2018 at 15:41

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