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I have a ceiling fan which uses a 1.6 uF capacitor. Now that the fan is not spinning, can I replace the capacitor with a 2.0 uF (same 450 vac) one which I have in hand?

I have several ceiling fans that no long work (either slow or not running at all). They look identical. I opened one and found a 2.0 uF capacitor in it. So, I bought several. I opened another fan and found it used a 1.6 uF capacitor. There are four other ceiling fans in the room that don't run at full speed. It is my guess that they all use 1.6 uF capacitor. Since I have more than 10 2.0 uF capacitors in hand, I wonder if I can use them to replace the failing capacitors.

The capacitor on the left is the one I intent to use to replace the one on the right, which is actually larger and heavier than the 2.0 uF one.

enter image description here

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Yea. However with 2.0 µF, auxiliary winding will draw more current compared to 1.6 µF. It will help motor produce more torque too compared to 1.6 µF.

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If you analysed the frequency response of a motor winding (inductive) and the series capacitor you would get a phase shift of 90 degrees at resonance: -

enter image description here

Just look at the left hand side of the picture above. The phase shift is always 90 degrees at resonance. This would correspond to the AC frequency (50 or 60 Hz) of your incoming power. If you increased the capacitor from 1.6 uF to 2 uF, the resonant frequency drops by proportionately \$\sqrt{\frac{1.6}{2.0}}\$ or 89%.

If the induction motor is 4 pole then 90 degrees corresponds to a quarter turn of the shaft and running the motor with a phase shift of about 85 degrees isn't going to be a big deal but it may make a slight bit more noise because mechanically and electrically it isn't perfectly aligned.

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