0
\$\begingroup\$

I have done research on different batteries and cannot find a maximum OR minimum voltage to keep NiMH AA batteries within. It seems that typically battery chargers will measure the negative voltage CHANGE or the temperature, but are not designed to hit a certain voltage limit.

I have seen some claim that 1.5V is a good upper limit and 0.9V a good lower limit, but my question essentially boils down to:

What do most electronics want and expect from the AA batteries they run on?

For reference, here is the datasheet I found for Eneloop AAs

\$\endgroup\$
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ The voltage when full doesn't matter much. It drops as soon as you start using the cell. Full detection is done (as you have found) with negative voltage change when charging with a constant current. Safe discharge voltage is actually higher. 0.9V is the limit when doing other things (very slow discharge, not normal operation.) \$\endgroup\$ – JRE Feb 28 '18 at 16:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ It does if there is a risk of over-volting something. "Doesn't matter much" suddenly matters if charged in circuit. \$\endgroup\$ – mckenzm Jul 9 at 0:42
2
\$\begingroup\$

I have done research on different batteries and cannot find a maximum OR minimum voltage to keep NiMH AA batteries within.

Well the very first hit when googling "NiMH AA battery data sheet" gave me this information: -

enter image description here

If different batteries are specified at different levels then there is no generic upper and lower limit.

What do most electronics want and expect from the AA batteries they run on?

Most people regard the voltage output as being 1.2 volts nominally.

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Welp, you got me there. I guess I was mainly getting thrown off by several claims I would find that regular alkaline batteries were "nominally 1.5V" and that NiMH at 1.2V wouldn't work generally, but I have found that this is a myth. \$\endgroup\$ – pbandjazz Mar 2 '18 at 13:34
  • \$\begingroup\$ I have a more powerful google fu LOL! \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka Mar 2 '18 at 13:35
-2
\$\begingroup\$

Electronics will work topically from 1.6v all the way down to 1v being somewhere in the middle is best

\$\endgroup\$
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ Some reasoning for this would be helpful. \$\endgroup\$ – Drew Mar 13 at 5:14
  • \$\begingroup\$ That is well designed electronics. If you are not using any sort of regulation, 4x1.6V= 6.4V. Which is a bit high for 5V TTL. Whereas 4x1.4V is 5.6V, which is a better upper end. \$\endgroup\$ – mckenzm Jul 9 at 0:47

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.