-4
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How to simplify this?

hi, a somewhat basic question: if i4 = 1, and all resistors have value R, what would be the voltage drop between a and b?

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closed as off-topic by Olin Lathrop, TonyM, Andy aka, Leon Heller, Finbarr Mar 2 '18 at 15:03

  • This question does not appear to be about electronics design within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • \$\begingroup\$ Can you show what you have done so far to find the answer? EE.SE is not a free homework-solving website \$\endgroup\$ – MrGerber Mar 2 '18 at 12:41
  • \$\begingroup\$ Hint: R2, R3 and R4 are connected in parellel. \$\endgroup\$ – Bart Mar 2 '18 at 12:43
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    \$\begingroup\$ We don't just do your homework for you here. Also, a dimensionless quantity for whatever you mean by "i" doesn't make any sense here. Sloppiness with units is not tolerated here, as it probably isn't in your class either. -1 for that, and the sloppy writing too. \$\endgroup\$ – Olin Lathrop Mar 2 '18 at 13:05
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    \$\begingroup\$ One thing that beginners have trouble with when reading circuit diagrams is that the behavior of the circuit does not depend on where the components are drawn, but on how they are connected. So you have to look at the connections between the components, not their locations. That connection on the top connects one end of R2 and one end of R3 and one end of R4 together. Redraw the circuit so that that connection is obvious. Same thing for the connection on the bottom. \$\endgroup\$ – Pete Becker Mar 2 '18 at 13:05
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    \$\begingroup\$ thank you so much everyone for taking your time! really much appreciated! I have indeed to crack my head more before asking for help! \$\endgroup\$ – Martin Horst Mar 2 '18 at 13:18
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As @Bart said as a hint, R2, R3 and R4 are in parallel. If you try to move the resistors and their connections to find an arrangement, you may get this :

schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

So, you should be able to apply Ohm's Law by yourself, I guess (I hope).

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  • \$\begingroup\$ cool! I only visualized one parallel, after looking a bit more, I saw all 3 resistors were tied togetjer; thanks a lot for sharing the online circuit simulator! \$\endgroup\$ – Martin Horst Mar 2 '18 at 13:24
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    \$\begingroup\$ It's a knife edge, answering homework questions that the OP hasn't shown any attempt to do or even shown any thinking on. Is it encouraging learning or encouraging future lazy OPs? Is it providing guidance or is it easy vote-chasing for those answering? \$\endgroup\$ – TonyM Mar 2 '18 at 13:30
  • \$\begingroup\$ sorry, friends. Believe me, I have tried to do it before asking. Next time, I will post also my attempts. \$\endgroup\$ – Martin Horst Mar 2 '18 at 13:57
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    \$\begingroup\$ Thanks for all the downvotes. Next time, downvote the question before the answer. \$\endgroup\$ – cab13140 Mar 2 '18 at 15:00
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    \$\begingroup\$ Next time don't answer lazy homework questions. The question was downvoted, as deserved. However, lazy homework questions shouldn't be answered, which is probably why you have accumulated 4 downvotes (currently). It is really bad when people dump crap on us and walk away with the desired result. Lots of people could have written your (rather obvious) answer. The rest of them showed the proper restraint in not doing so, however. You put your 2 minutes of glory ahead of the site, and got downvoted because of it. \$\endgroup\$ – Olin Lathrop Mar 2 '18 at 17:16

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