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If i don't have the "A" NMOS,how do i know the "B" NMOS can replace it ? For example,here is the "A"NMOS product summary,if the BVdss min(V) is 60V for "B"NMOS too ,Can B replace A?

enter image description here

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    \$\begingroup\$ How should we know what your requirements for the MOS are? These are just infos about what you have, not what you need. \$\endgroup\$ Mar 4, 2018 at 13:20
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    \$\begingroup\$ Critical specs are RdsOn and Vgs(th) to ensure T['C] rise is acceptible \$\endgroup\$ Mar 4, 2018 at 13:32
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    \$\begingroup\$ Ciss may matter too. A lot. And Crss. \$\endgroup\$ Mar 4, 2018 at 13:45
  • \$\begingroup\$ This actually is a valid question if you think about it - it's a question about the design process and how it works. \$\endgroup\$
    – Andy aka
    Mar 4, 2018 at 14:49

1 Answer 1

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When you first choose a MOSFET (or any component) for a design, you should consider: -

  • The desired circuit functionality and
  • The desired circuit performance and
  • The data sheets of candidate MOSFETs (or any component)

When you replace that MOSFET (or any component) with another, you should consider: -

  • The desired circuit functionality and
  • The desired circuit performance and
  • The data sheets of candidate MOSFETs (or any component)

So, no visible circuit to study means no clear understanding of: -

  • The desired circuit functionality and
  • The desired circuit performance

And no clear idea of what MOSFET (or any component) can be chosen

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  • \$\begingroup\$ @electroniccomponent Have you understood this answer? \$\endgroup\$
    – Andy aka
    Mar 23, 2018 at 14:14

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