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I've read a lot of material about zinc air batteries, many firms successfully made their own prototypes of rechargeable zinc-air batteries. Is it possible to do it at home?

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According to this video it is possible to make a zinc-air battery. I just don't know if it is rechargeable.

You just need a zinc sheet for the negative electrode, and a steel wool for the positive electrode separated by an isolator soaked in sodium hydroxide as an electrolyte.

Update

I've been reading a little about zinc-air batteries and I can confirm that this configuration does not produce a rechargeable battery.

The rechargeable zin-air battery technology is a very recent one and I don't believe that we can find anything about how to do it at home in the recent future.

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Rechargeable ones generally use exotic catalysts or flow-cell tech to allow long cycle lives, but you could try basing it on the aluminium-air battery design. Search for aluminium-air batteries on youtube. Easier to make and much easier to get hold of aluminium than zinc, because u can use household cooking foil. For the air cathode, wrap a spiral of fine wire around the outside of the separator (if using a cylinder form) with the aluminium foil underneath the separator, wrapped around a cardboard tube etc. Then smear some carbon and manganese dioxide mixture from an alkaline battery all over the outside of the wire spiral. This forms an air cathode which will work at low current using natural air humidity. Can be misted with water to increase current. The battery gives about 1.4V off load.

This could be converted to rechargeable simply by using zinc foil instead of aluminium, since manganese dioxide and carbon can catalyse both the discharge (oxygen-consuming) and charge (oxygen-releasing) reactions.

Zinc plated copper or stainless steel wire mesh is probably the easiest negative electrode material for home-brew cells, but a simple zinc-plated (galvanised) 6" nail does a good job for experiments.

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