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I have 2 different models of the same device. The old model is not receiving power from its power source which is the following power pack:

Old Model's Adapter

I want to test another power pack to see whether the issue is with the power source but I don't have an identical power pack. This is the power pack that came with the new model of the device:

New Model's Adapter

Based on the electronics information on these power packs, would the new model's adapter be compatible with the old model device?

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The second model of the Power Supply appears to be rated at half the power of the first model as per the specifications (i.e. 60W v/s 30W respectively). I'd say its not adequately rated.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ If I were to connect the second power pack to the device that the first power pack came with, is the worse case scenario that the device just won’t receive sufficient power? \$\endgroup\$
    – Guru Josh
    Mar 8, 2018 at 10:42
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yep! That's correct. \$\endgroup\$
    – Speculator
    Mar 8, 2018 at 11:07
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Speculator surely the worst case is that the power supply overheats, catches fire, and burns the house down. \$\endgroup\$
    – Simon B
    Mar 8, 2018 at 15:58
  • \$\begingroup\$ @SimonB That’s my question. What happens if you use a power pack that is rated to a lower amperage? \$\endgroup\$
    – Guru Josh
    Mar 9, 2018 at 21:15
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    \$\begingroup\$ @GuruJosh If it's well-designed, it will shut down and refuse to work. If it's cheaply designed, it will overheat and fail. \$\endgroup\$
    – Simon B
    Mar 9, 2018 at 21:25

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