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What is the recommended AWG size for connecting a USB male connector?
The link from Instructables.com below uses only a spare LAN cable and no mention of the size:

http://www.instructables.com/id/Creating-you-own-USB-cables/

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    \$\begingroup\$ Don't rely on this cable for anything critical. The USB specification was created for a reason, your home made cable is unlikely to meet its requirements. \$\endgroup\$
    – Colin
    Mar 13, 2018 at 9:08

3 Answers 3

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USB specifies 28 AWG for the signal pair, and 28 to 20 AWG for the power pair. Note that 28AWG is rather thin for supplying 500mA (the maximum current that USB 2.0 specifies for power), and will result in a high voltage drop for long cables. Most USB cables use 26 or 24AWG for the power pair, or even bigger (typically 22AWG) for the longer ones (~3 meters).

As Passerby said, Ethernet is usually between 22 to 26 AWG.

But it is not only about the AWG. USB cables are supposed to have 90Ohm impedance, and ethernet 100. The impedance mismatch could be a problem for long cables, especially if you use it as an extension to another regular 90Ohm USB cable. USB High Speed will be more sensitive to this than Full Speed.

In short, it will most likely work, except if you're making a very long cable, but you'll definitely be violating USB specs.

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It's mainly dependent on how you will use your USB port.

In the USB 1.0 and 2.0 specs, a standard downstream port is capable of delivering up to 500mA (0.5A); with USB 3.0, it moves up to 900mA (0.9A). The charging downstream and dedicated charging ports provide up to 1,500mA (1.5A).

AWG 24 can handle upto 2,000mA (2A) of current safely. So it's applicable on all situations.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Partially true... AWG24 will only provide enough voltage at 2A using cables less than 50 centimetres. Since voltage drops over distance depending on the AWG, using 24 AWG with 50 cm cable will drop from 5v to around 4.45-4.6v which is just enough to power most 5V 2A devices. \$\endgroup\$ Mar 17, 2019 at 12:35
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USB can use between 20 AWG to 28 AWG wires. Ethernet tends to be 22 to 26 AWG. The lower the number, the more current it can carry.

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    \$\begingroup\$ I guess those quality 5A cables have 20AWG then. \$\endgroup\$
    – neverMind9
    Mar 22, 2019 at 20:07

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