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Can ESD protection shoes be worn at any conditions (in relations to electrical / electronic systems). I understand ESD protection shoes / overalls are used against generating static on the body. But is the protection good, when user standing near HV systems or user getting an electric shock. I was curious and would like to get some information. Thanks for the help.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by pipe, Finbarr, PeterJ, Dmitry Grigoryev, Simon B Mar 22 '18 at 23:34

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    \$\begingroup\$ They are to protect sensitive circuits and not to protect a person. Go google stuff. \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka Mar 14 '18 at 11:52
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    \$\begingroup\$ I'd have thought that the makers of the shoes would have something to say about it! \$\endgroup\$ – Leon Heller Mar 14 '18 at 12:02
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    \$\begingroup\$ I think the OP is asking.... "If I wear ESD shoes am I at more risk of getting fried by the HV systems?" \$\endgroup\$ – Trevor_G Mar 14 '18 at 13:42
  • \$\begingroup\$ ESD shoes are for ESD floors \$\endgroup\$ – Voltage Spike Mar 14 '18 at 15:35
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ESD shoes are deliberately slightly conductive so that static build-up on a person is limited (if the floor is conductive and grounded, which it will be in a well designed ESD-safe facility). Static dissipative shoes that are stated to meet agency requirements have an "SD" mark. Here is a CSA marked shoe:

enter image description here

Work boots that are "shock proof" are made to have high dielectric strength and high resistance- with no upper limit (the CSA approved boots can withstand 18kV and pass < 1mA).

Typical logo for that kind looks like this (the Omega and CSA symbol, the green triangle indicates something unrelated):

enter image description here

You may be able to find shoes with both markings (depending on the standards that are met), but it's perhaps unlikely. The criteria for SD is\$10^6 \Omega < R < 10^8\Omega\$, and the criteria for shock protection is effectively R > 18^6 so there is a relatively narrow overlap. You should certainly not assume one is suitable for the other unless they bear genuine markings to indicate they have been tested.

Static electricity can reach a few thousand volts (and the SD shoes must not break over under those conditions) so there is no extra danger in working with SD shoes, wrist straps etc. provided that only reasonably low voltages are involved. See the standards documents for the test conditions.

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This type of shoes are used for environments where they work with integrated circuits or PCBs very sensitive to the electrostatic of the human body. But these do not provide the protection for an electric discharge, for this other types of protection must be used. The use of shoes with ESD protection is often used a lot in the PCB factories as an example.

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