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I have extracted an IR remote reciever from a device. The only prescription on it is: 4344S

On the back its mentioned A-Z.

Generally, a question for the wise. How do people in industry search for products for reverse engineering if they dont know anything about a component?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Analyse the circuit to find out which pin is which (ground, power, output) and whether the power is 3.3 V or 5V. Get the remote control that was used with it, record its signal, and anayse it to find out the frequency and message format. Then choose the appropriate replacement from a catalogy, for instnace Vishay makes such receivers. Or just go for a 36 kHz jellybean 3.3-5V receiver. \$\endgroup\$ – Wouter van Ooijen Mar 17 '18 at 11:19
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Generally, a question for the wise. How do people in industry search for products for reverse engineering if they dont know anything about a component?

If I want to "acquire" the ability to make a product that isn't copyrighted or patented I'd already know what the product does in terms of functionality and performance (else why would I want to "copy" it).

Based on complete knowledge of functionality and performance, I'd redesign the unit and along the way I'd likely improve it. I'd choose components such as the IR device pictured in your question, based on proper design studies and not rely on assumptions that may have been made in the original design that were potentially flawed.

That's how a wise engineer would approach it. If you want to know how a bodger might do it then ask a different question.

In other words, reverse engineering is less optimum at producing a decent solution than a proper redesign (to the skilled and wise engineer).

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  • \$\begingroup\$ You might also factor in what (meeting the need) you could get in quantity at a decent price, which may well not be what the original maker could. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Mar 17 '18 at 15:56

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