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This is directly from this website: "The current installed capacity on Ontario’s transmission grid is more than 36,800 MW". Does it mean total energy generated & transmitted in a year OR the grid's capacity to transmit this much electricity in a second?

Also, can I compare this number with the energy generated by 1 litre of biofuel (which is 9 KWH)? i.e. do I need to multiply 36,800 by 3600 (minutes*seconds) to ensure I'm comparing in the same dimensions?

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    \$\begingroup\$ I think that means the sum of each installation's "nameplate capacity". Whether or not all of that capacity is in use at any particular time is a different matter (and probably never actually happens, in practice.) There is another term, "capacity factor," that relates the actual capacity in use at any particular time. That factor should almost always be less than 1. \$\endgroup\$
    – jonk
    Mar 18 '18 at 1:34
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    \$\begingroup\$ Megawatts are a unit of power. \$\endgroup\$
    – τεκ
    Mar 18 '18 at 1:37
  • \$\begingroup\$ As @τεκ points out, there is a difference between energy and power (energy is power times time.) Liters of fuel are "energy" and not "power." To convert average power to energy, multiply by the time period. To convert energy to average power, divide the energy by the time over which it is used. Even then, energy is measured in calories, Joules, Newton-meters, watt-hours, watt-seconds, and depending on assumptions implied in the conversation, (water behind a dam), bizarre things like hectare-meters. \$\endgroup\$
    – jonk
    Mar 18 '18 at 1:44
  • \$\begingroup\$ The annual energy consumption of Ontario for 2014 was 140 TWh. \$\endgroup\$
    – τεκ
    Mar 18 '18 at 2:00
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    \$\begingroup\$ @TonyStewart.EEsince'75 Can you post up the schematic for that? ;) I may be able to find a use for it. :) \$\endgroup\$
    – jonk
    Mar 18 '18 at 2:14
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Megawatts is a unit of power not energy. What the utility is telling you is that they have enough electric generators on hand to generate up to 36,800 megawatts of power at one time. You need to multiply time by power to get energy. However since this maximum capacity will almost never be used at one time, it is somewhat meaningless to use this number for energy calculations.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ It is also kind of idealized in that at any given time, some generators may be unavailable due to maintenance. I am kind of assuming, since I don't work in that field. \$\endgroup\$
    – mkeith
    Mar 19 '18 at 3:57
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Based on the comments in the thread, I realized I should look at total energy generated. This link has the info I was looking for: http://www.ieso.ca/corporate-ieso/media/year-end-data

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    \$\begingroup\$ You have posted this as an answer rather than as an update to your question. If it is the answer you were looking for then you can "accept" it to indicate that your problem has been solved. \$\endgroup\$
    – Transistor
    Mar 19 '18 at 9:44

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