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If wire size correlates with Amp, and if Voltage correlates with Amp reversely (?), why do we have electric lines (for transmission) with high voltage, but also wires with big radius? I remember reading somewhere transformers "carry" power, so the power is constant -- but, I get confused when it comes to transmission. Don't conductors still carry power even if it is lost?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by winny, Sparky256, RoyC, Finbarr, PeterJ Mar 29 '18 at 9:30

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • \$\begingroup\$ Voltage correlates to wire dielectric insulation rating but also relates to conductor losses V=I*R in per unit length measure \$\endgroup\$ – Sunnyskyguy EE75 Mar 28 '18 at 22:42
  • \$\begingroup\$ What kind of books have you been reading??? Harry Potter books would be more accurate. Honestly, some books can be miss-leading or not clear, so read more books and you will find contradictions and on occasion the truth. \$\endgroup\$ – Sparky256 Mar 28 '18 at 22:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ Those big wires, outside in the freely moving air, get to dump heat into the environment. Life is good for big wires outside. \$\endgroup\$ – analogsystemsrf Mar 29 '18 at 3:43
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If wire size correlates with Amp, and if Voltage correlates with Amp reversely (?), ...

Since \$ P = VI \$ (volts x amps) then for a given power your statement is correct.

... why do we have electric lines (for transmission) with high voltage, but also wires with big radius?

Because we are transmitting very high power. Both V and I are high.

I remember reading somewhere transformers "carry" power,

Either your memory is faulty or what you read is incorrect. Transformers don't "carry" power. They transform voltage and current from one level to another.

... so the power is constant

No, power depends on the load. For a given load the power in = power out + losses.

Don't conductors still carry power even if it is lost?

It is not clear what you are asking here.

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