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enter image description hereI have question about adc differential input. Are they not suppose to be positive and negative? Than you get the benifits of differentials signals. In the circuit illustrated the differential input output voltage amplifier. Both of outputs are positive, so advantage what advantage does this circuit have than?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ It seems strange that you would say that when I noticed one of you previous questions is about an instrumentation amplifier, with an accepted answer. \$\endgroup\$ – a concerned citizen Apr 18 '18 at 19:53
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yeah I am concerned too. I am trying to design this circuit with AC excitation to input chop the load cell and remove offset. And also do ratiometric measurements to reduce the noise. Got lost and did not see the obvious. \$\endgroup\$ – Gianfranco Walrus Schwengle Apr 18 '18 at 20:02
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With analog signals differential is the difference between two points. For example with OUT+ = 2.5V and OUT- = 2.0V, differential voltage = 0.5V. With differential digital signals it is common to refer to the two signals as positive and negative which refers to their logic polarity, not voltage. The voltage for both signals are positive in most cases.

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Both of outputs are positive, so advantage what advantage does this circuit have than

Look at the inputs to the two opamps - they come from different sides of the source load-cell.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Ohh snap did not notice that, lmao feel like such fool now. Even if the polarity was changing the output signal would be opposite of each other. Shit I was simulating the circuit before, and was like why am are my outputs not of opposite polarity. \$\endgroup\$ – Gianfranco Walrus Schwengle Apr 18 '18 at 19:57

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