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The load is merely 2k yet voltage source provides ~3 amps to the circuit. I hope this isn't the case in reality because I want to build this. Simulations done in ltspice. Why so much current flowing into the circuit? If this is accurate how do I reduce current into circuit to reflect only what load needs?

Greatly appriciated.

Circuit Current Into Circuit Load Current

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    \$\begingroup\$ Check the current supplying the op-amps and the op amp's output currents. \$\endgroup\$
    – Mike
    Apr 21, 2018 at 19:56
  • \$\begingroup\$ I really don't know, but what's the breakdown voltage of a 1n5363b? \$\endgroup\$ Apr 21, 2018 at 19:57
  • \$\begingroup\$ Google says 1n5373b is 68V 5W. \$\endgroup\$
    – Oldfart
    Apr 21, 2018 at 20:01
  • \$\begingroup\$ And if you remove the D1/D2, what happens? \$\endgroup\$ Apr 21, 2018 at 20:14

1 Answer 1

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A real circuit would have a power supply capacitor and this capacitance is needed because real opamps need them on their supply pins. Now, if you looked at the current taken from the voltage source supplying power you would not see those high peaks.

However, this sim is not the real world and, more than likely, the model for the opamp is not perfect in every way. Last on the list is designing a model that takes the correct current under all circumstances.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ To add to Andy's answer, use the supply as 48 Rser=0.1 Cpar=1m, for example. \$\endgroup\$ Apr 22, 2018 at 6:44

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