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I'm attempting to troubleshoot an old guitar amp and this component appears to be blown out.

Can someone here help me identify this component?

Component "front" Component "back"

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    \$\begingroup\$ 50uF 6.4V electrolytic. \$\endgroup\$ – Brian Drummond May 13 '18 at 11:54
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    \$\begingroup\$ What is the approximate era and region of origin for this product? \$\endgroup\$ – Spehro Pefhany May 13 '18 at 14:08
  • \$\begingroup\$ Are there any other caps in the circuit, what are their labels and what is the circuit powered with? If it has a 24V supply it is possibly a 50V cap if it has a 4.5 or 6V supply it is likely a 6.4V cap. If it is in a signal path then the voltage may be very low or used as line decoupling. Photo of circuit board cheers up the folk here immensely in questions like this to gain context. \$\endgroup\$ – KalleMP May 14 '18 at 7:22
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The capacitor (50uF/6.4V aluminum electrolytic) looks a lot like a Philips part except for the beige sealant on the left (positive) end (they stopped making that kind of component decades ago, I believe Vishay picked up the line or was spun off). Maybe a long life version or one made by another company. The use of a comma rather than a period as the radix point most likely indicates European design.

You need to put the replacement in the same polarity as the original was or bad things will happen. The negative side is the one with the black ring. Hopefully you made note of that (e.g. by taking a photo) before hacking the part out.

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Looks like a rather old 6.4µF 50V capacitor.

You can replace it with a modern one of same voltage rating (higher voltage rating can't hurt though) and same capacitance value. 50µF is uncommon, but you can use 47µF. These electrolytic caps have rather wide tolerances (like 20%) so the 50µF isn't that accurate anyway.

You can use axial leads (same as yours) or radial leads if it fits. Most caps have radial leads these days, so the radial equivalent will be easier to find.

Note the capacitor is polarized. "+" is the end which has been squeezed, "-" is the end with the black stripe. On radial caps the "-" is labeled "-". You need to install it with proper polarity.

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    \$\begingroup\$ It says "6,4V" - does that correspond to 6.4 uF do you think? I agree it is an electrolytic capacitor but the markings are not that clear to me. \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka May 13 '18 at 11:27
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    \$\begingroup\$ Better also tell OP about polrization. Otherwise pictures would be nice. :-) \$\endgroup\$ – a concerned citizen May 13 '18 at 11:27
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    \$\begingroup\$ Looks like you switched the units in your first sentence. Shouldn't it be 6.4V 50uF? \$\endgroup\$ – dim May 13 '18 at 11:29
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    \$\begingroup\$ 6.4 volt is somewhat untypical, where 50V would be very common. However, you don't see 6.4uF that much either. Could still be just 6.4V 50uF, but maybe the markings are manufacturer specific and mean something entirely different. \$\endgroup\$ – Rev1.0 May 13 '18 at 11:35
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    \$\begingroup\$ @rev 6.3V is very common. \$\endgroup\$ – dim May 13 '18 at 11:44
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This value (50uF, 6 V) is available on mouser... This is the link... http://www.shorturl.at/bnry2

I would suggest testing the old capacitor before changing it to see if its still functional. The acoustics may change upon introducing a new one.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Too late for that -- it's already been diked out of the circuit. \$\endgroup\$ – Dave Tweed May 13 '18 at 12:05
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    \$\begingroup\$ And you don't think that soldering that close to the capacitor will change its "acoustics" more than replacing it with a fresh one? \$\endgroup\$ – Dave Tweed May 13 '18 at 12:33
  • \$\begingroup\$ Nice point... I never would be able to see the after effects with the equipment I have... Isn't there cold soldering or something...? \$\endgroup\$ – Vibhu May 13 '18 at 12:47
  • \$\begingroup\$ By the way, I once picked up a broken 100uf 60v capacitor from outside the electronics store I bought things from.. And I haven't been able to place it's geo at home, among all the components I have searched for in my stack... \$\endgroup\$ – Vibhu May 13 '18 at 12:50
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    \$\begingroup\$ No, it is definitely electrolytic with that kind of construction. \$\endgroup\$ – Dave Tweed May 13 '18 at 14:16

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