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enter image description hereReferring to the above picture, can an antenna array mounted on Node A direct beams towards Node B and Node E, without the need for an antenna rotator (or manually orienting the antenna array towards the respective nodes)? In other words, can the antenna array orient its beam along the vertical direction (along the line joining Node B and Node E)?

The motive for this question is related to the upcoming IEEE 802.11ad standard. By operating at 60 GHz, users communicate with one another through directional beams pointing at each other. Without the use of mechanical rotators for the antennas, how could these users possibly orient their beams in a changing/moving environment?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Have you read the Wiki article on phased antenna arrays? Is there anything specific you don't understand? \$\endgroup\$ – The Photon May 14 '18 at 18:04
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Yes, this can be done by adjusting the phase of the signal fed into each element of the array A, so that constructive interference is achieved in the direction you want to transmit, and destructive interference is produced in other directions.

This is called a phased antenna array.

The details of how well the signal can be directed, how much energy leaks into other directions, etc., depends on the size of the array, the number of elements, etc.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ What would happen in the case of a horn antenna? Can such signal directivity be achieved? \$\endgroup\$ – V-Red May 14 '18 at 18:09
  • \$\begingroup\$ @V-Red, horn antennas could be used but the range of steering would be limited. The individual horn geometry would determine the possible beam angles, and phased array technique would allow you to steer a narrower beam within that range. If you want 360 degree steering, a horn is not a good choice for the array element. \$\endgroup\$ – The Photon May 14 '18 at 18:15

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