0
\$\begingroup\$

It's for a resin burner--frankincense etc--that doesn't have a temperature regulator so it burns too hot. I don't need to know an actual temperature, just to be able to raise/lower the temp'. Thanks.

\$\endgroup\$

closed as off-topic by Charles Cowie, Michel Keijzers, Dmitry Grigoryev, DoxyLover, MCG Jun 1 '18 at 10:19

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave these specific reasons:

  • "Questions on the use of electronic devices are off-topic as this site is intended specifically for questions on electronics design." – Dmitry Grigoryev, DoxyLover, MCG
  • "Questions on the repair of consumer electronics, appliances, or other devices must involve specific troubleshooting steps and demonstrate a good understanding of the underlying design of the device being repaired. See also: Is asking on how to fix a faulty circuit on topic?" – Charles Cowie, Michel Keijzers
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Not enough information. Is it mains powered? You're in USA, so 120 V? If so an old-fashioned dimmer switch would work. \$\endgroup\$ – Transistor May 14 '18 at 22:21
  • \$\begingroup\$ A dimmer control seems to the easiest solution. \$\endgroup\$ – Sunnyskyguy EE75 May 14 '18 at 23:08
  • \$\begingroup\$ Get a variac (aka auto-transformer). \$\endgroup\$ – Ale..chenski May 15 '18 at 1:04
  • \$\begingroup\$ In the 70’s they just used a Triac dimmer and calibrate temp daily in Production in Japan for soldering iron temp. \$\endgroup\$ – Sunnyskyguy EE75 May 15 '18 at 1:31
0
\$\begingroup\$

If it mains-powered, then most lamp dimmers will work. For example (for US):

http://www.lutron.com/en-US/HeroImages/CredenzaLampDim_01_hero.png

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you so much for including that link because I was wondering if I could use that type of dimmer. \$\endgroup\$ – Alpharalpha May 15 '18 at 22:26
0
\$\begingroup\$

You can halve the power by putting a diode in series. Often times this will do it.

Once caveat is if your heater actually uses a PTC heating element. This is quite common for small things you want to not overheat.

It becomes very difficult to lower the temperature by changing duty-cycle, as the PTC is self regulating.

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thinking ahead that the heating element may fail in the future I've been looking at little heating elements, many are ptc, should I avoid that type if I'm going to be using a lamp dimmer? \$\endgroup\$ – Alpharalpha May 15 '18 at 22:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ You can always experiment, just be aware that the ptc type might prove to not work. A problem is that PTC is probably the right way to make this product. So you might be choosing between a better one, and a worse one, that you can fiddle with. \$\endgroup\$ – Henry Crun May 15 '18 at 22:33

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.