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I have a couple more questions about power to homes in Europe. Our device draws between 12A and 45A (at 230vac) depending on its configuration. It appears that at the high end of the scale that will be a problem in the UK or France or Germany, where the domestic distribution panel is a single phase. (protected by a main breaker in the 60 to 120A range) In these circumstances (UK etc.) I assume there will be several individual circuit breakers each rated at 16A? IIRC I saw something about 32A circuit breakers somewhere - is this possible?

In other countries (like Sweden) is the main protection a 3 phase breaker such that if one phase is overloaded all phases are interrupted? or are there 3 individual breakers? In these cases I assume the 3 phases are distributed throughout the home - some lights are on phase A, some outlets on phase B and some of each on phase C. Is there more than one circuit breaker for each phase? For instance is it possible that the outlets on the first floor use phase A, breaker 1 while the outlets on the second floor use phase A, breaker 2? What would be a common rating for each

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I'm in the UK, and my 45A device (instant heat electric shower) has its own 63A RCD/breaker wired directly from the company master fuse. This fuse also supplies my distribution panel, with its array of smaller breakers for the 'conventional' circuits.

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I’m in Switzerland and circuits are spread between the 3 phases, 10A and 16A breakers.

Some are « linked » as 3 together for the oven for example.

Note in the UK some power circuits are rated as 32A and this depends on the number of sockets they feed and spurs etc.

You would do well to purchase the wiring regs from the IEE - 17th edition now I believe. And it’s good reading - if you have insomnia... :)

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Euro circuits are generally 13 or 16A. Don't expect to use the full capacity, there will be de-rates required on a plug-connected device, or on a hardwired device which shares a circuit with receptacles.

Even on a dedicated circuit, expect de-rating to be required. Any large draw device will need a dedicated circuit.

The "32A" UK circuits are not good for 32A. They are actually 16A circuits wired in a "ring" so 16A is fed both directions. Treat them like a 16A circuit.

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