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One of the maxwell equations state that the magnetic field induced around a closed loop is proportional to the electric current plus displacement current (rate of change of electric field) it encloses.

It means that either current or change in electric field or both can cause a magnetic field.

My question is that if both current and change in electric field cause magnetic field then whether the magnetic field induced by a current and the magnetic field induced by a changing electric field will reinforce each other, cancel out, or combine in some other weird way. Please avoid mathematical explaination. Just tell me in simple words the answer of my question

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Depending on the values and sign of conduction and displacement current you might get a constructive or destructive combination and therefore a 'reinforced' or zero magnetic field. That's Ampere's law by the way. And, not to put you off, but mathematical explanation is probably the best way of explaining this stuff.. \$\endgroup\$ – mickkk May 19 '18 at 11:40
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For a simple example take the capacitor. Current through in the capacitor at all times is capacitance x rate of change of voltage across its plates. The current begins as conventional charge-movement current flowing into and out of both plates and, in between the plates, it is a displacement current because electrons don't flow.

Both currents are identical and, if the shape of the capacitor was small relative to some idealized and remote closed-loop, you wouldn't be able to tell if it were just normal old-fashioned charge flow or displacement current.

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