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I have a device which I originally bought in the the UK and now I'm trying to get it working in the US. The adapter that came with it is labelled as "Input: 230V AC 50Hz / Output: 9V 2000mA"

I'm curious what the effect of just plugging this in using a standard UK to US plug adapter? Would this require the full 230V to produce the correct output? I know my laptop adapter is labelled as 100-240V but I have a feeling that this is not the same.

If this won't work is there some kind of fairly cheap converter that can be used to step up the voltage?

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closed as off-topic by pjc50, Transistor, brhans, Leon Heller, Voltage Spike May 23 '18 at 21:13

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    \$\begingroup\$ Most probably you will get a much lower output voltage. \$\endgroup\$ – winny May 23 '18 at 14:46
  • \$\begingroup\$ I'm afraid there is not a cheap solution. I know some people using 110V devices in the Netherlands (220-240V) and quite heavy/big transformers are needed. \$\endgroup\$ – Michel Keijzers May 23 '18 at 15:07
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It depends.

If it's an old-school "linear" power supply then likely it will produce a much-reduced voltage. If it was intended to be a regulated supply the regulation is likely to be non-functional resulting in the output volage varying with load.

If it's a switcher then it's harder to predict, it may work fine, it may do nothing, it may overheat, it may produce a reduced voltage, it may work fine at small loads but not at full load.

You could use a step-up transformer but it's adding more bulk and more losses. I expect it is probablly more economical to just replace the power brick with a universal input one.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ yes, get a replacement... easier, cheaper and they are common. \$\endgroup\$ – Solar Mike May 23 '18 at 15:25
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks. I think I'm leaning to just trying to replace the power supply. For my own learning, is there any way to determine from the label if its a linear power supply? e.g. If the Input says input 230 does that mean it needs 230 to work, if it accepts a range it would always say something such as 100-240? \$\endgroup\$ – user1194439 May 23 '18 at 15:30
  • \$\begingroup\$ If only a single voltage is specified it means the manufacturer only gaurantees it will work at (approximately) that voltage. \$\endgroup\$ – Peter Green May 23 '18 at 15:35
  • \$\begingroup\$ Supplies marked with only 220/240V as input may not have ANY output with 110V input. \$\endgroup\$ – mike65535 May 23 '18 at 15:38

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