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I'm searching for a tool that would display the voltage drop across a resistor in PSpice. Is there an element (like a voltmeter) that would help me able to do so?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ If you know the current, do the math. \$I*R\$ gives you the Vdrop. \$I{2}R\$ gives you the watts. \$\endgroup\$ – Sparky256 May 24 '18 at 4:00
  • \$\begingroup\$ You probe voltage on both sides and use math to subtract. \$\endgroup\$ – mkeith May 24 '18 at 4:16
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    \$\begingroup\$ If you using Cadence Design Systems' OrCAD or Allegro software and you are placing voltage markers (probes) via the schematic capture window, there is a "voltage differential marker" on the toolbar. (Hint: Perform an Internet search using "PSpice voltage differential marker".) There are also "voltage markers" that use the '0' (zero) ground potential as their reference potential. \$\endgroup\$ – Jim Fischer May 24 '18 at 6:21
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Follow the below steps to get voltage across any component in ltspice.

Run the simulation and Right click on the component net to set as one reference point like below. enter image description here

Then click on the other end of the component as normally we do, this will show you voltage across that component.

enter image description here

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  • \$\begingroup\$ My apology, I didn't read it correctly Pspice , I though ltspice. \$\endgroup\$ – LED Sep 4 at 14:21
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To view the voltage drop across any resistor, one can perform either Bias point simulation or transient simulation. After making the circuit and running bias point simulation, just click on the icon shown in the photo below. This will show the voltage across all the resistors in the circuit.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Which photo? I can't see. \$\endgroup\$ – Jakub Rakus Jul 31 '18 at 17:34

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