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Do Electronic/Electrical engineers need to be licensed? I have heard something along these lines but I do not recall where. And if so what is the license name? If I take a stab at my own question I am assuming it might have to do with specific engineers, like if you're going to work on power systems for a power plant or something??? What about an embedded Systems Engineer?

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    \$\begingroup\$ it may depend on the country/jurisdiction. In the UK, the employer might require somebody with CEng for specific senior positions, as that person may be responsible for public safety. \$\endgroup\$ – Neil_UK May 25 '18 at 5:23
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    \$\begingroup\$ In Canada , Engineers must belong to a provincial self regulated Association of Professional Engineers and Geologists with annual fees. Technologists may join as an option. It is also illegal for any company to hire non-registered Engineers for a job title containing the word Engineer. However Engineering Specialist is ok or similar. But not so in America in general, but I don’t the requirements for work that impacts public safety. These , I assume must be registered. Graduates must work under licenced Engineers who must sponsor the candidate in about 3-5 years \$\endgroup\$ – Tony Stewart Sunnyskyguy EE75 May 25 '18 at 5:26
  • \$\begingroup\$ In the US, some engineers need to be licensed Professional Engineers. If you design electrical systems for buildings and whatnot you might need that. But if you work for a tech company, likely you do not need any license. \$\endgroup\$ – mkeith May 25 '18 at 6:12
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In the US, it boils down to this : If you can kill people or damage property then you need a professional license. Commercial wiring, you need a license. Aerospace, you probably need a license. But what it really means is you can stamp your designs and certify that the design meets any standards or laws in the field you are working in. You also are required to work under an engineer with a PE for a given amount of time and you must past a test which includes the design process to certify you know how to design things safely. You then get certified with the state you are working in (similar to other professional certifications like CPA)

If you want to know which subset of jobs for electrical engineering, then look at job postings, it's all dependent on the industry.

Having a stamp also means you better know what your doing, if the design fails you could be legally responsible for the failure.

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    \$\begingroup\$ the bridge failure in FL which was supervised during installation by design Corp. has yet to point any fingers \$\endgroup\$ – Tony Stewart Sunnyskyguy EE75 May 25 '18 at 6:07
  • \$\begingroup\$ @ tony stewart I doubt any fingers will ever be pointed, because the "design firm" is a minority-owned firm staffed with minorities. \$\endgroup\$ – analogsystemsrf May 26 '18 at 15:31

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