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I am interfacing two RS422 devices but failing to do so. I started to monitor my device signals and fell into confusion. Please help me understand a few things. I am attaching snap 01 of my device (LTC2872) data on TX+ line measured with respect to GND.

oscilloscope 1 Snap02 of Standard RS422 to USB Converter data on TX+ measured with respect to ground.

oscilloscope 2

Question 01. From LTC2872 Snap01 I get data as per theoretical concept. With data appearing in Snap02, why are there extra bits appearing here? Data length should be 1.04ms at 9600 8N1.

Question 02. Why are the voltage levels of both devices different? How do I match this level?

P.S: Differential Signal (A-B)

enter image description here

Differential Signal measured A w.r.t B

enter image description here

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    \$\begingroup\$ Show the schematic of your circuit, especially how you handle the grounds, and any fail-safe resistors. \$\endgroup\$ – CL. May 26 '18 at 6:57
  • \$\begingroup\$ I have attached Schematics please check. Plus I am using 120ohm resistor for termination. \$\endgroup\$ – Sidk May 26 '18 at 7:12
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    \$\begingroup\$ First of all, your 232/485 select pins are not connected to anything, this is not indicated as an option in the datasheet and thus may give unexpected behaviour. One of your TE pins isn't connected, same story. Lastly measuring just one signal on an RS422/485 line wrt ground makes no sense at all. It's a differential system, you need to measure both signals and subtract them. \$\endgroup\$ – Asmyldof May 26 '18 at 8:10
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    \$\begingroup\$ I think we would like to see the enable and data signals on the same scope snapshot. They could explain the changes between transmit and receive modes better. \$\endgroup\$ – KalleMP May 26 '18 at 9:06
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    \$\begingroup\$ This schematic does not show the receiver, so nobody can tell you why the signals at the receiver behave that way. But it appears you forgot to connect the ground. \$\endgroup\$ – CL. May 26 '18 at 9:18
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Wait a second... shouldn't termination resistors go between Y and Z?

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    \$\begingroup\$ This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. - From Review \$\endgroup\$ – pipe May 26 '18 at 9:57
  • \$\begingroup\$ Well, I think this IS an answer. It is simply phrased as a hint to the author to check their schematics. And it points exactly where to check. \$\endgroup\$ – Maple May 26 '18 at 10:17
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    \$\begingroup\$ Instead of phrasing it as a hint, why don't you try phrasing it as an answer? \$\endgroup\$ – pipe May 26 '18 at 10:48
  • \$\begingroup\$ This appears to be the correct answer and also forces the OP to verify application connections YZ are outputs and AB are inputs. Bravo \$\endgroup\$ – Sunnyskyguy EE75 May 26 '18 at 14:50
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When using RS-485, a transmitting device will only drive TX+ and TX- when it is actively transmitting. When it's not transmitting, it will leave the bus floating so as to allow other devices to transmit. At the times the wires don't appear to be cleanly high or low, nothing is driving them. A start condition is defined as a transition from a an active marking state (TX+ high TX- low) to an active spacing state (TX+ low TX- high), and following each byte the line must be left in a marking state for at least one bit type.

A couple of things to note:

  1. RS-422 is generally identical to RS-485 except that there's typically only one transmitter, and thus no need to disable it when not in use. Your examples show that the transmitter is being gated.

  2. This particular transmitter only drives the line in a marking state for one bit time prior to transmission, but some others drive the line in a marking state for longer (e.g. 10 bit times) at the beginning of the transmission. Omitting the delay would reduce the time required to transmit data by nine bit times, but including it will prevent transmissions from getting garbled by noise that immediately precedes them. Which approach is better depends upon how the bus is terminated, and whether the protocol would be immune from phony start bits [e.g. if the transmission starts with a padding byte of 0xFF, but a receiver doesn't care about whether it is received correctly, that padding byte would serve the same purpose as a 10-bit marking prologue, and including both would be redundant and unnecessary redundancy].

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Do I need to induce delays to match marking or spacing time? I have tried terminating with 120ohm but things do not work. I am stuck. \$\endgroup\$ – Sidk Jun 7 '18 at 3:08
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Sidk: Preceding transmissions with a 0xFF byte the receiver won't care about will ensure that there's a nice sequence of marking bits before the real data. On the tail end, one should make sure one doesn't release the line before the stop bit is fully transmitted. When using half-duplex, it's necessary to ensure that one side releases the line before the other side tries to transmit usable data. Other than those issues, data can be sent with whatever timing is convenient. \$\endgroup\$ – supercat Jun 7 '18 at 14:54
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Tx1+=LTC_A1 = A1 , perhaps is gated by TE_1 with 485/_232="1" as a differential voltage from resting at midpoint Vcm to a start bit =1 which may be a tristate mode if not enabled.

while in "snap 1", Tx is binary idle =1 before the start bit if TE_1 = 1 is left on all the time.

added:

The new waveforms satisfy the IC specs on page 4. Keep in mind this just defines the lowest of 7 levels of the OSI model for the physical voltage levels and nothing higher such as protocol or application.

RS232 Receiver
Input Threshold Voltage  0.6min 1.5nom 2.5max V
Input Hysteresis         0.1    0.4    1.0 V
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  • \$\begingroup\$ This is not USB; both traces show the RS-422 bus. \$\endgroup\$ – CL. May 26 '18 at 6:57
  • \$\begingroup\$ That’s what it says for snap 2 \$\endgroup\$ – Sunnyskyguy EE75 May 26 '18 at 6:58
  • \$\begingroup\$ Nothing about USB. Its 422 data line. \$\endgroup\$ – Sidk May 26 '18 at 7:13
  • \$\begingroup\$ Then it must be tristate . Identify your test pins \$\endgroup\$ – Sunnyskyguy EE75 May 26 '18 at 7:21
  • \$\begingroup\$ RS-422 is differential signalling. You don't measure it from the ground, you measure between two lines. \$\endgroup\$ – Maple May 26 '18 at 7:25

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