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How to make the lightning port of iPhone output 5V power?

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How to make the lightning port of iPhone output 5V power?

Just like the android phone, if I connect the ID pin to the ground then the phone will work as a USB host, after that it will output 5V power(the so-called OTG).

update

I don't know why some people cast opposing votes to this the question.

And I think this a quite normal question that many people can face. Perhaps you should check this product: Sandisk iXpad https://www.sandisk.com/ixpandflashdrive2 enter image description here I just confuse how these devices can output power by the lightning port.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Andy aka, winny, brhans, Brian Carlton, Dmitry Grigoryev Jun 1 '18 at 11:51

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • \$\begingroup\$ iPhones have a port for connecting lights? Wow! What will Apple think of next ?? \$\endgroup\$ – brhans May 31 '18 at 11:40
  • \$\begingroup\$ Why is iPhone different? The OTG function is very useful. unless iPhone does not support the USB protocol .. \$\endgroup\$ – lukeluck Jun 1 '18 at 1:13
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Your question is vastly answered by: https://apple.stackexchange.com/questions/119707/how-much-power-can-be-drawn-from-the-lightning-connector-by-a-external-device

Since Apple doesn't publicly commit to power levels or even pin compatibility on the lightning connector, anyone interested in learning how hardware should be designed to work with Apple's dock connectors could choose to join the MFI program:

https://developer.apple.com/programs/mfi/ As a developer, Apple will provide you with detailed hardware requirements, schematics and even technical support. I haven't seen anyone take a current meter and volt meter to the devices and post publicly, but wanted to make you aware of one official avenue to get this sort of information across all of Apple's iOS product line wether they use the 30 pin dock connector, the lightning dock connector or some of the other specific iPod connectors.

quoting: Additionally, the pin out for lightning connectors requires an authentication chip according to wikipedia, so getting power out of a lightning device involves software authentication before power will flow.

The article describing 8 pins that are active, indicates that when power flows into the phone (the opposite of your use), pins 1 and 5 are ground and power respectively. However, until your cable identifies itself to iOS, no power will be provided.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ then I can see that it's very difficult to design such a device because of the limitation of Apple company. \$\endgroup\$ – lukeluck Jun 4 '18 at 3:49
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Since Apple even communicates with USB Chargers, I would say you may need a Thunderbolt Controller.

Mouser link

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  • \$\begingroup\$ my question is how can the iPhone lightning port output power to supply the other devices like the Sandisk iXpand. connected to a charge adopter is another thing. \$\endgroup\$ – lukeluck Jun 1 '18 at 2:00
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yea, it will output the Power after it recognized the Device, connecting the Identification to the Ground maybe wont work for Apple Devices \$\endgroup\$ – Playa Jun 1 '18 at 4:07
  • \$\begingroup\$ that's my question, how to recognize the device and after that step, how to output the power?@Playa \$\endgroup\$ – lukeluck Jun 1 '18 at 9:15
  • \$\begingroup\$ "it will output the Power after it recognized the Device" - you can't recognize any device unless you provide the power first. \$\endgroup\$ – Ale..chenski Jun 1 '18 at 17:22

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