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The neutral wire of the 3 phase 4 wire system is 0volts compared to the ground. We also know that it provides the return path for phase currents. Under unbalanced loading, current does flow in the neutral wire as Ineutral =-( Ia + Ib + Ic)

So how does the current flow from neutral to ground through human body sometimes when both of them are at same potential ?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ You misunderstand. It flows from phase to neutral, not neutral to ground. \$\endgroup\$ – τεκ Jun 1 '18 at 4:08
  • \$\begingroup\$ electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/225781/… \$\endgroup\$ – jsotola Jun 1 '18 at 4:22
  • \$\begingroup\$ Current wants to flow from neutral to ground. But normally, copper wire provides a low resistance path for the current, and it is not likely that large currents will flow through a person who touches it. But, if the low resistance pathway is broken due to a fault, then current may flow from a neutral wire through a person to ground. But, in the case there is a fault, I am not sure we should call it a neutral wire. \$\endgroup\$ – mkeith Jun 1 '18 at 5:42
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how does the current flow from neutral to ground through human body sometimes when both of them are at same potential

Current can only flow through your body if a high enough voltage is applied across it so if neutral and ground are actually at the same potential (they are often connected somewhere), and your finger is touching neutral and you are standing on the ground, this won't happen. That may not always be the case though...

Might help to do more research specifically related to grounding and ground faults.

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