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Can we use 555 timer IC in autmotive electronics design? If not then please suggest an IC in order to create dealy at laod side.

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    \$\begingroup\$ what is dealy at laod side \$\endgroup\$ – jsotola Jun 4 '18 at 5:33
  • \$\begingroup\$ Why not? Pick one for automotive application and use it \$\endgroup\$ – Gregory Kornblum Jun 4 '18 at 6:07
  • \$\begingroup\$ @jsotola : it is 2 leds in sereis with V( typ)=2.8V, and would like to provide 10 microsec delay between them. \$\endgroup\$ – NSR Jun 4 '18 at 6:33
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    \$\begingroup\$ Not without protection. 'Automotive' means survive sustained -12v or +24v, and transient +160v, for bad jumpstarting and alternator load dump respectively. Otherwise, go for it. \$\endgroup\$ – Neil_UK Jun 4 '18 at 6:37
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Neil_UK does it really mean that? Usually, automotive parts means AEC-Q100, which puts some heavy constraints on temperature operating range, electrostatic discharge and stuff like that, but I doubt automotive ICs can really withstand +160V transients, or even 24V, can they? \$\endgroup\$ – dim lost faith in SE Jun 4 '18 at 7:42
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In principle you CAN use anything, as long as it fits within the specifications for your automobile device/part.

Note for the NE555 there is a similar SE555 See example from TI, which is suitable for military purposes (with disclamer), which has increased specifications.

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