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I'm new to ESC, sorry if this is a noob question, is it possible to somehow pair or read the battery level from an ESC?

What I'm looking for is to read the battery level from an ESC electric skateboard so I can show that on an App.

This is the board: https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/2096/3333/products/MR30_to_bullet_adaptor_for_ESC_V2_to_Motors_V1_e4017283-957d-44cc-82e5-536dcbfda249_1800x1800.jpg?v=1527698368

used with this sort of RC: https://www.aliexpress.com/item/2-4Ghz-Remote-Controller-With-Receiver-Universal-for-All-ESC-Electric-Skateboard-Longboard-Skate-Board-Scooter/32817830821.html

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closed as off-topic by Chris Stratton, Nick Alexeev Jun 6 '18 at 21:40

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions on the use of electronic devices are off-topic as this site is intended specifically for questions on electronics design." – Chris Stratton, Nick Alexeev
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • \$\begingroup\$ "2.4Gz" means what? \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka Jun 6 '18 at 16:34
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You can not do it with your RC cause it is one-directional system. But you can do it in common way. You need any voltage/current sensor+ Arduino + Arduino BLE/Bluetooth shield.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Actually the chips used in almost all 2.4 GHz systems are bi-directional. But it would take custom firmware. Many off-the-shelf RC receivers have been reprogrammed to send BLE telemetry packets to phones, even though they don't have BLE chips. That's because BLE at the lowest level is sort of an evolution of the commonly cloned nRF24 air-format, making it possible to explicitly create something that will be interpreted as a BLE beacon packet. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Jun 6 '18 at 17:46
  • \$\begingroup\$ That is great idea. But only if you have original firmware or know what send from TX or at least have some RF analizer to see packets or may be know command encoding. If you do not have anything of that reprogramming the chip (if one is used there) gives only not working system. Nothing more. \$\endgroup\$ – Mike Petrichenko Jun 6 '18 at 18:02
  • \$\begingroup\$ Actually it's generally not hard to create something new from scratch; typically a cheap USB-based logic analyzer is used to see the traffic between the MCU and radio chip; often these days that's enough to identify it as a minor variation of an existing known protocol. An RF analyzer is not needed, since the behavior of the radio is described by its data sheet, so if you know what the configuration registers are set to, you know what is happening over the air. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Jun 6 '18 at 18:33
  • \$\begingroup\$ Sure there is nothing hard at all. But if Chris could do that then I do not thing he asked the question cause for person who can use logical analizer (or at least who knows what it is) and can change firmware the ESC is not a problem at all. \$\endgroup\$ – Mike Petrichenko Jun 6 '18 at 21:58

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