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I am relatively new to electrical work, mostly stay on the software side of things. I recently soldered header pins onto a few led matrixes I have. They are 3 wire leds (power, data, ground). I'm trying to figure out if I shorted the connections when I soldered them before I plug them in (I see tiny gaps, but first time soldering a breadboard and easy to use too much!)

I have continuity through everything I should have continuity through - data to data, hot to hot, ground to ground, but I also have continuity from hot to ground.

Part of me things that makes sense since it should be a circuit, part of me thinks that it means I have hot and ground touching in the soldering somewhere.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ You could be measuring pullup R on data to 5V. Reverse leads and compare results , while disconnected from source. \$\endgroup\$ – Sunnyskyguy EE75 Jun 10 '18 at 14:22
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I also have continuity from hot to ground.

This narrows it down. Look at the solder joints (under magnification) where hot and ground are next to each other. Scrape away any solder splash.

You would need a 4 lead ohm meter (milli-ohm) to find the short with an ohm meter.

UPDATE

When I have it set on 2000, hot and hot read 0, hot and data read 1, hot and ground read 1000.

The short is between hot and data, not hot and ground.

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Use the ohmmeter function of your meter to measure resistance.

The continuity test function will sound if the resistance beween the probes is less that some low value - about 40 Ohms, for one of my meters - the ohmmeter will show the actual resistance.

There may be a fairly low resistance between the hot and ground terminals of your LED strips, causing the continuity buzzer to sound.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ When I have it set on 2000, hot and hot read 0, hot and data read 1, hot and ground read 1000. \$\endgroup\$ – user2827635 Jun 10 '18 at 5:21

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