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Our company is exporting our product to European market. To sell it to Europe we need CE mark. so we let the test lab test only EMC(EMI+EMS) because our products usually don't equip any RF nor AC power.

Now, we are developing a board type product without housing. The board type product's purpose is very same to the Arduino. So the board can be used in lab. But it can be an IoT Gateway product when the end user implement a product by using our board. And the board doesn't include any RF part and it is powered by DC an adapter.

I think that we need to the EMC test as same to the products which have enclosures.

I have some questions at this point.

When we do the electrostatic contact discharge, contact point should be all point where our fingers could be contacted. If we do the contact discharge test to the very important point, for example: MCU lead, it might be failed.

Our partner test lab says we need an enclosure for the test of the non-housing board.

  • Is it correct?

  • How do you test for the board type products?

cf. I have tried to find Arduino test report for reference but I have failed.

Thank you very much.

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This is where you have to read the rules creatively.
Since your product is part of a full product, or a demo kit, you could only be testing for emissions.

You can test ESD on the terminals, for your own peace of mind. You don't have to test ESD on the bare board since handling precautions should be in place.
Unless, for example, you expect your grandma to handle it in normal circumstances.

You can also test immunity, to check if there are major design flaws, but since you rely on the system integrator for an enclosure, you could skip this.

We sell bare (potted) boards for integration in machines, and we do test emission, immunity, esd, eft and surge. Because we know you can't rely on most system integrators to do their job well. And then your product doesn't work or misbehaves.
Even though you could, on paper, state it's not your fault.

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ESD tests are best to perform with this housings.

It is not a good idea to perform ESD tests or surge tests on bare board where the micro controller pins are simply brought out without any protection. Contact discharge tests will fail the boards sooner.

Concerning Arduino boards, each and every pin will fail if we do the tests.

It depends on the use case of your product.

What is the use case? Is it a medical device? Is it a house hold device, a device just used as rapid prototype only, device meant to be used in lab alone or a device meant to be apart of a bigger subsystem..

If it is latter case, you do not have to be perform ESD tests directly on the board.

Also, for emissions and immunity boards Need no have real RF sections or AC power.. Every trace is there an antenna.


Concerning Arduino Boards:
I do not expect and also i do not see the industry standards compliance for Arduino (IEC).
Here is the standards they meet. https://www.arduino.cc/en/Main/Warranty

enter image description here

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  • \$\begingroup\$ The board type product's purpose is very same to the Arduino. So the board can be used in lab. But it can be an IoT Gateway product when the end user implement a product by using our board. \$\endgroup\$ – Blue Cloud Jun 19 '18 at 5:23
  • \$\begingroup\$ @BlueCloud I request to add this info into he main question itself. It is very valid info \$\endgroup\$ – Umar Jun 19 '18 at 5:25

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