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Is there such thing as a compensation BNC like the ones found on 10X probes? I'm basically taking about a BNC coupler with a resistor and a adjustable cap in it. I guess it would be like a standard 10X BNC attenuator but with the variable capacitor, so it can be used to connect a standard BNC to alligator clips cable but with the added ability of being able to reduce capacitive load and compensate for cable capacitances?

I've looked all over and I don't even know what to call such a thing, compensator?

Thanks

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Im still looking for something like Jippie's suggestion, a feedthrough attenuator, but with a built-in adjustable capacitor, just as you would get on a 10X probe. Is there such thing or should it be custom built? \$\endgroup\$ – S.s. Aug 31 '12 at 9:04
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This might be what you are looking for:

http://www.pmk-gmbh.com/en/products/Cable_Divider_38/PKT_Series_72.html

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Yes they exist and are called "BNC feed through attenuator". They usually look similar to the one in the image below. Depending on the specifications (impedance, attenuation, power, bandwidth) they range from bit expensive to bizarrely expensive. Most common type is the 50\$\Omega\$ feed through termination, but there are all sorts of variations with set attenuation.

BNC feed through attenuator

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Hey jippie, thanks for your answer, ive seen those before, however the difference from what im looking for is that they dont have a variable or adjustable capacitor in it, which differs from the one im looking for. \$\endgroup\$ – S.s. Aug 19 '12 at 15:31

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