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i have a project for my microcontroller lab for making voltage regulator using arduino. Can anyone help me with this.

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closed as too broad by JRE, Transistor, Olin Lathrop, Leon Heller, Dmitry Grigoryev Jul 2 '18 at 9:26

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Welcome to EE.SE, but if you are looking for a free design service then you have come to the wrong site. On the other hand, if you show some effort, post a schematic, post the specifications (you didn't even say what voltage and current ranges you require) you will get some help. If you don't the question will be closed as too broad. If you haven't already, then please take the site Tour to learn how the site works and what type of questions you can ask. Also, I recommend that you capitalise your posts properly if you want to be taken seriously. \$\endgroup\$ – Transistor Jun 30 '18 at 12:47
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    \$\begingroup\$ "Can anyone help me with this." No. At least not here. You have shown no effort of your own, and it's unclear you even understand what a voltage regulator is, since implementing one with a arduino makes little sense. There are such things as switching power converters that could be considered voltage regulators in the right context, and such devices can be implemented with a digital controller. However, that is what we call a advanced topic that can't be reasonably discussed in a answer to such a naive question. \$\endgroup\$ – Olin Lathrop Jun 30 '18 at 15:06
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You can make a voltage regulator from an Arduino Nano simply by applying a voltage of 6.5V to the Vin pin vs. GND.

  • +5V will be available on the 5V pin
  • +3.3V will be available on the 3V3 pin

You can leave the other pins and the USB jack disconnected. No need for any programming. Read the datasheets for the AMS1117 and CH340 to determine the maximum current available.

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Take a look at how an analog voltage regulator works. Part of the circuit is a feedback path that observes what the actual output voltage is, compares that to the desired output voltage, and adjusts something to keep the two voltages the same. Now, replace everything in the analog feedback path with your Arduino.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I expect there's some kind of switching regulator involved. Arduinos aren't known for their analog outputs. A switching regulator using the ADC and a PWM output would be reasonable, though. But, just guessing since there are no details in the question. \$\endgroup\$ – JRE Jun 30 '18 at 13:08
  • \$\begingroup\$ @JRE Yes, I agree. I was intentionally vague, just trying to give the OP a nudge in the right direction. \$\endgroup\$ – Elliot Alderson Jun 30 '18 at 13:25
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You can use a LM317/LM350 and a digital potentiometer wired to your arduino. By adjusting the potentiometer’s resistance, you can adjust the output voltage from ~33V to 1.25V. Remember that P_dissipate = ( Vin - Vout ) * I_load. Note that you shouldn’t expose any pin on your arduino to more than 3.5V for 3V3 boards, and 5.5V for 5V boards like nano, uno. You can measure the voltage from this device simply with just a resistor in series with a zener diode, though that is a bit of a hack.

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