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In this schematic, what might the double arrows at M5 and M4 represent?

This is in the power supply for a 1980's CRT monitor, if that narrows it down any.

schematic

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    \$\begingroup\$ I would suspect connectors. \$\endgroup\$
    – Joren Vaes
    Jul 8, 2018 at 7:04

2 Answers 2

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enter image description here

Another example enter image description here Inline connector as seen in the image.

Ref. 1: http://nolanwebdev.com/6323/qM6f-6350/

I will add the source of images soon. Searching it again.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Nice! Where's that from? \$\endgroup\$ Jul 8, 2018 at 8:07
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As far as I know, that's not a standardized symbol. So, this is specific to the engineer or the company he worked at, and there can't be a certain answer, but:

As these circuit diagrams often wander somewhere on the line between trying to show the idea of the circuitry and being helpful for servicing, and by the fact that these << components have explicit designators (M5), they are almost certainly points where PCB trace connects to a wire bridge or an off-board component.

As @Tony points out below, it seems to be standard:

It was a military standard for wire pin and socket in a connector that I used when I worked in Aerospace in late 70's

So, that kind-of-but-not-fully aligns with my suspicion.

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    \$\begingroup\$ It was a military standard for wire pin and socket in a connector that I used when I worked in Aerospace in late 70's \$\endgroup\$ Jul 8, 2018 at 7:14
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    \$\begingroup\$ So, I'll add that info to the answer. Thank you, @TonyEErocketscientist! \$\endgroup\$ Jul 8, 2018 at 7:17
  • \$\begingroup\$ I also have some background in mil-std/aerospace, and I immediately thought "connector", but not any specific kind. \$\endgroup\$ Jul 8, 2018 at 15:17
  • \$\begingroup\$ The Anderson constant current loop (p 194, Robert B. Northrop: "Introduction to Instrumentation and Measurements", 3rd ed, i.imgur.com/vjkJTAj.png) also has these arrows, and it was developed by NASA...they just might be involved in aerospace ;) \$\endgroup\$
    – adamaero
    Feb 26, 2019 at 22:51

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