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I am working on a personal project that will feature an LCD panel and push buttons to control the graphical user interface. For the LCD I would like to use the SHARP LS020B1DD01D (for the specifications, see http://www.panelook.com/LS020B1DD01D_SHARP_2.0_LCM_parameter_20847.html) due to the size dimensions and resolution. I have been researching for several days, trying to find a compatible display driver for it, but as I am not very experienced with using separate LCD's and display drivers yet (up until now, I have been using display modules that already include the driver board), I am having trouble finding the right part for the job.

Are there certain key specifications that I should be looking for? How does one usually go about choosing the best display driver for their embedded system projects? Are there any online resources that could be helpful for finding a solution or learning more about this subject matter?

Note: Like I said, I don't have much experience with this, so please forgive me. I appreciate any feedback you can provide.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Notice the word "discontinued" here. Please also remember that if you want help with an item, it is highly likely that the data sheet should be easily downloaded and not require some form of login to obtain it. \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka Jul 9 '18 at 11:53
  • \$\begingroup\$ Fair point. My apologies. \$\endgroup\$ – MrHallows Aug 5 '18 at 17:22
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If you are building an embedded type project you may want to steer away from this LCD panel. The device requires four power supply voltages and is setup to need a controller to drive it that can provide a video frame rate of 60Hz. In other words this device does not contain any internal memory to persist its display like you would want for a simple embedded device.

There are plenty of small color graphic displays available in the market that include the controller as part of the display and then your embedded MCU just has to load the display image to RAM in that controller. After that the controller will take care of keeping the display refreshed without the MCU having to supply that data 60 times a second.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ You are right. It is one of the very few displays I've been able to find that fit the 2.0" screen size and 240x160 pixel resolution, which is perfect for the project. Albeit, I have found a few other (closely similar) options with well supported drivers and internal RAM that are currently in production. I appreciate your feedback. \$\endgroup\$ – MrHallows Aug 5 '18 at 17:45
  • \$\begingroup\$ isnt framebuffer memory to hold the image is usually the work of GPU/CPU and not the LCD? what memory do you mean when you mentioned "memory to persist its display"? \$\endgroup\$ – GENIVI-LEARNER Jan 19 at 20:56
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    \$\begingroup\$ @GENIVI-LEARNER - Your questions seem to indicate that you should re-read my answer again. The types of LCD panels that are part of typical computer monitors are displays that require being fed an constantly refreshing signal to keep the screen content showing. That does come from a display controller inside the computer where a GPU/CPU are located. These display controllers have lots of memory that is read over and over again to create the refreshing signal for the external computer type monitor. (continued) \$\endgroup\$ – Michael Karas Jan 21 at 5:23
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    \$\begingroup\$ (continued from above) The small types of displays that I recommended in my answer have a display controller built right on board and enough memory to hold the information to create a display for every pixel on the display. The controller reads this memory over and over to keep the display LCDs refreshed so the display can be seen (persists until content changed). These types of displays are much easier to apply to low cost embedded products. \$\endgroup\$ – Michael Karas Jan 21 at 5:27
  • \$\begingroup\$ makes so much sense now. thanks! \$\endgroup\$ – GENIVI-LEARNER Jan 21 at 12:03

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