0
\$\begingroup\$

hopefully this is an okay place to ask this question, but anyway, I'm working on a project to measure efficiency of a mono-crystalline solar cell based off temperature in the enclosure. The solar cell is 150x130mm and the enclosure will match that size and be a bit taller so I can introduce a light source. My first plan for increasing the temperature beyond ambient temperature was to use either a heat-gun or a hair-dryer. I have a thermal sensor to see the temperature inside as it increases, but I'm wondering what other options I have to more effectively control the temperature in this small enclosure. I would like to increase the temperature to at least ~50 degrees Celsius, and on the other end possibly 0 degrees celsius, which would likely require a different tool. I've also thought of using a small Thermoelectric Cooler in order to cool down the environment, as well as heat up, but that requires a bit of setup so I'm not sure what other options I have.

TL;DR: What can I use to heat (and / or) cool a small insulated box?

\$\endgroup\$
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Dry ice and a fan are good for cooling. \$\endgroup\$ – stark Jul 14 '18 at 4:44
  • \$\begingroup\$ or even just regular ice (with some salt if you need to go below 0C) \$\endgroup\$ – Jasen Jul 14 '18 at 11:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ I have a heatgun with precision output temperature control. These are very useful. You can get to 50C pretty easily by just blowing the heatgun into the chamber through a tight fitting hole. There needs to be an escape vent somewhere also. If the back pressure is too high, the heatgun flow rate drops to near zero. \$\endgroup\$ – mkeith Jul 15 '18 at 2:37
0
\$\begingroup\$

A 100W~300W Halogen utility flood lamp is an effective heat source on a Triac dimmer to simulate Solar heat and a Muffin fan to speed up cooling response time and regulate temperature. Adjust distance to short path equal to floodlight width and reduce power before target temp as sensor may have slight delay.

\$\endgroup\$
0
\$\begingroup\$

if the measurements can be made quickly you could just pre-cool it and plot temperature against efficiency as it warms up.

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.