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How do I know the direction of magnetic field produced by a bar magnet, assume a electron present side to the magnet ?enter image description here

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A stationary electron (charge) will experience no force in a magnetic field.

You need to draw a velocity for the electron (current, rate of movement of charge) for it to feel a force.

The force experienced by a moving charge is at right angles to both the field, and the direction of current. See Fleming's Left Hand Rule to define the direction for that force..

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There is a lower school experiment that you can do that will help you understand the magnetic field of the bar magnet a lot better. Take a piece of paper and spread iron filings over the paper. Then carefully lower the paper down over the magnet. The iron filings will tend to line up with the magnetic field lines of the magnet.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Yeah thanks for the answer but I'm particularly asking about the electron present at the side of the magnet in which direction would the electron will experience the magnetic field take a look at the picture \$\endgroup\$ – user136174 Aug 7 '18 at 4:24
  • \$\begingroup\$ @user136174 why would the electron experience the magnetic field in any direction except for the actual magnetic field direction? \$\endgroup\$ – immibis Aug 7 '18 at 5:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ I'm asking what's the actual magnetic field direction please refer the photo posted by me \$\endgroup\$ – user136174 Aug 7 '18 at 5:33
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Magnetic field lines always from from north to south (remember north is up and compasses point north).

To find the direction of electrons use the right hand rule (technically they would be orbiting clockwise around the bar magnet).

Electrons flow straight in an electric field, not a magnetic field.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ eclectic -> electric? \$\endgroup\$ – immibis Aug 7 '18 at 5:44

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