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When I let Altium do autorouting and then I define a ground plane using a polygon connected to my ground pin, I often get layouts where a GND line is flanked on both sides by the GND polygon, and then at the ends, both connectors are connected to the GND polygon:

Is this actually good layout for a ~10-50 MHz circuit? Would it be between to get rid of the gaps between the two grounds (image center) and have the ground plane be continuous? That way there is more conductive material, and the left and right GNDs have a shorter path between them.

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    \$\begingroup\$ 1 - Don't use the autorouter in general. 2 - You can configure the polygon to pour over all same net objects (including traces). \$\endgroup\$ – Wesley Lee Aug 7 '18 at 16:30
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    \$\begingroup\$ You may think it's a GND line, but your netlist says otherwise. "NetC1_2" != "GND" ... \$\endgroup\$ – brhans Aug 7 '18 at 16:32
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    \$\begingroup\$ If they really are on the same net, there's a polygon setting called "pour over same net" or something like that, but all the green error markers make it look to me like you have your nets confused. \$\endgroup\$ – brhans Aug 7 '18 at 16:34
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    \$\begingroup\$ No, this is NOT "actually good" layout, basically for anything. \$\endgroup\$ – Ale..chenski Aug 7 '18 at 16:39
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    \$\begingroup\$ @user1850479 - yes, although that will not solve any issues created by the arbitrary auto-routing - its less bad if you at least placed the components manually in a way that makes some sense. In the schematic editor you can add power ports for GND to name a net or place net labels (press P then N) for signals, etc. \$\endgroup\$ – Wesley Lee Aug 7 '18 at 16:45
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Those are thermal relief connections to the ground plane to improve soldering. They won't create any problems as far as high frequencies go. You could change the settings in Altium to flood over those pads, whether that would create a solder problem depends on your board stackup and assembler's soldering process. I avoid ground planes on outer layers because they generally create broken areas of ground that could possibly radiate. Solid ground planes on inner layers are a better option IMO.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I think you misunderstood his question. He is asking why the ground plane pour doesn't connect to the traces. \$\endgroup\$ – evildemonic Aug 7 '18 at 17:48
  • \$\begingroup\$ OK, but doesn't make any sensre to route a ground trace in an area of a ground pour. \$\endgroup\$ – EE_socal Aug 7 '18 at 18:32

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